Alesis Recital Pro vs Williams Legato III: Discover the Best Piano for Your Home

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In this Alesis Recital Pro vs Williams Legato III review, we’ll get into the pros and cons of both models to help you find the best piano for your needs!

The Alesis Recital Pro is one of my favorite budget-friendly digital pianos. It’s very affordable but comes with features that you would expect from more expensive pianos. So, if you’re looking for your first digital piano, there aren’t many models that come close to the functionality of this piano.

That said, there is one piano that’s been making waves recently in the same range: the Williams Legato III. And when I tested this piano, I found a lot of good features. However, after thorough testing, I found that it still couldn’t compete with the Alesis Recital Pro.

Some pianists may prefer the Williams model, but if you want the most value for the money, I would recommend the Recital Pro. In this article, I’ll dive into all the reasons why I chose the Alesis in this Alesis Recital Pro vs Williams Legato III review.

I’ll explain all the features I tested and exactly how the Recital Pro won out. And by the end, you’ll know exactly which model would be the best fit for your needs.

Alesis Recital Pro vs Williams Legato III: Comparison Chart

Image
The Winner (#1)
Alesis Recital Pro - 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Hammer Action Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 12 Voices, Record and Lesson Mode, FX and Display
The Runner Up (#2)
Williams Legato 88-Key Digital Piano Level 2 190839037947
Model
Alesis Recital Pro
Williams Legato III
Product Line
Recital
Legato
Product Type
Portable digital piano
Portable digital piano
Number of keys
88
88
Hammer Action
Fully-weighted keys
Touch-sensitive keys
Tone Generation
Sampling
Sampling
Effects
Chorus, Modulation, Reverb
Tremolo, Flanger, Delay, Reverb, and Chorus.
Polyphony
128
32
Layer Mode
Split Mode
Number of voices
12
10
Duo-Mode
Headphone input
Recording
MIDI
Pedal
Yes, single pedal only
What I like
Price
$379.00
$339.90
The Winner (#1)
Image
Alesis Recital Pro - 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Hammer Action Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 12 Voices, Record and Lesson Mode, FX and Display
Model
Alesis Recital Pro
Product Line
Recital
Product Type
Portable digital piano
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
Fully-weighted keys
Tone Generation
Sampling
Effects
Chorus, Modulation, Reverb
Polyphony
128
Layer Mode
Split Mode
Number of voices
12
Duo-Mode
Headphone input
Recording
MIDI
Pedal
Yes, single pedal only
What I like
Price
$379.00
More infor
The Runner Up (#2)
Image
Williams Legato 88-Key Digital Piano Level 2 190839037947
Model
Williams Legato III
Product Line
Legato
Product Type
Portable digital piano
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
Touch-sensitive keys
Tone Generation
Sampling
Effects
Tremolo, Flanger, Delay, Reverb, and Chorus.
Polyphony
32
Layer Mode
Split Mode
Number of voices
10
Duo-Mode
Headphone input
Recording
MIDI
Pedal
What I like
Price
$339.90
More infor

Last update on 2022-12-05 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Alesis Recital Pro vs Williams Legato III: A Head-to-Head Comparison

I tested the feel, tone, and piano features of both instruments to find the winner. I did a lot of tests and research, and by the end, the score was 3-0 in favor of the Alesis. The Williams Legato III put up a good fight in some categories, but it still couldn’t compete with the Alesis Recital Pro.

In this section, I’ll explain exactly how I tested the pianos and how I felt about them. That way, you get the full picture, which is very important when finding a digital piano to use on your musical journey.

Feel & Playability

The winner: Alesis Recital Pro

If your digital piano doesn’t feel like an acoustic piano, you may run into some trouble. That’s why the first phase of testing these pianos involved checking the feel. I played both of the pianos for a couple of minutes to gauge the weight and key texture of the instruments. And as I guessed, the Alesis Recital Pro’s fully weighed keys easily beat out the Williams Legato III.

+Hammer Action

If you want a piano that can replicate how it feels to play an acoustic piano, the Alesis Recital Pro is the right option for you. This piano comes with fully-weighted keys. So, you will feel just the right amount of resistance whenever you press a key.

My only complaint with the Alesis Recital Pro’s hammer action was that all the keys had a fairly uniform weight. While it isn’t a major issue, this isn’t how an acoustic piano is a setup. When you plan an acoustic piano, you’ll notice that the lower keys are a bit heavier than, the higher keys, and it would have been nice to have this feature on the Recital Pro.

While I had one complaint about the Alesis Recital Pro’s hammer action, there was no doubt that it was better than the Legato III. This is because the Williams Legato III only has touch-sensitive keys. This means that you can tweak the volume and strength of the note by adjusting how hard you push the keys.

However, playing this piano felt closer to an electric synth than an acoustic piano. There are some pianists that enjoy the non-weighted keys, but if you’re looking for realism, the Williams Legato III might not have what you need.

Alesis Recital Pro comes with fully-weighted keys
Alesis Recital Pro comes with fully-weighted keys

Tone

The winner: Alesis Recital Pro

After judging how the pianos felt, it was time to test how they sounded. Between the two, the Alesis Recital Pro sounded much better because of the sound system. And even when I plugged the pianos into the same speaker, I noticed more detail in the Alesis’ voices.

On top of that, the Recital Pro comes with more voices than the Williams Legato III. So, not only did it win in terms of tonal quality, but it beat out the Legato III with its tonal variety as well.

+Tone Generation

As far as I can tell, both pianos used sampling to create their sounds. This means that each piano is loaded with a set of recordings. And whenever you press a key, you trigger these recordings and produce a sound.

Both of these pianos do a good job of replicating the tones of other instruments. However, the samples on the Alesis are slightly better than the Williams. So, you can expect more realistic and detailed sounds when playing the Alesis Recital Pro.

The Alesis Recital Pro is a bit better if you’re particular about tonal quality. That said, these are still entry-level pianos, so it would be unfair to expect them to replicate the sound of other instruments perfectly.

+Sound Library

Another reason the Alesis Recital Pro ended up taking the point in this category was the sound library. The Williams Legato III only has 10 different voices, while the Alesis has 12. Granted, this doesn’t sound like that big of a difference, but if you want the piano to sound exactly how you want it, the extra two options on the Recital Pro are a huge deal.

Both pianos come with all the essential tones like an acoustic piano, electric piano, synth, and organ voices. The only difference with the Recital Pro is that you get additional options for your acoustic piano sounds.

 Williams Legato III only has 10 different voices
Williams Legato III only has 10 different voices

Piano Features

The winner: Alesis Recital Pro

The last comparison point I had was the piano features. The Alesis Recital Pro easily won out again because it came with more playing modes and had a great maximum polyphony. This is another testament to the versatility of the Recital Pro and another reason I find it to be one of the best digital pianos in this price range.

+Playing Modes

The Alesis Recital Pro has dual and duo modes. These are great for beginners and make for a very versatile piano. You can blend different voices together with dual-mode to create a unique sound. With duo mode, you divide the piano into two mini pianos that have the exact same tuning.

The duo mode is great for both piano lessons and for piano duets. As a beginner, these are probably two of the most useful playing modes to have.

On the other hand, the Williams Legato III doesn’t come with any additional playing modes. And even if additional playing modes aren’t necessary for beginners, it still would have been nice to have them on the Legato III.

The Alesis Recital Pro has the two main playing modes
The Alesis Recital Pro has the two main playing modes

+Polyphony

The Williams Legato III only has a maximum polyphony of 32. And while this should be enough for most beginners, it limits the amount of expression and notes you can play simultaneously. The Alesis Recital Pro completely solves this issue with 128-note maximum polyphony, which would be sufficient for even a professional pianist.

Alesis Recital Pro vs Williams Legato III: The Similarities

Most of the similarities between these two pianos are surface level. These are both portable digital pianos with similar designs and have a similar control panel. Even if the Alesis Recital Pro has a display, switching between voices and modes is about the same on both pianos.

Both of these pianos are easy to bring around, affordable and have the full range of the piano. And while I prefer the Alesis Recital Pro, both options would make a decent digital piano for any beginner.

Quick Rundown of the Alesis Recital Pro

Alesis Recital Pro - 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Hammer Action Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 12 Voices, Record and Lesson Mode, FX and Display
  • Start playing professional keys today - the ultimate beginners digital piano loaded with 12 expertly crafted voices and powerful educational features
  • Universal responsive feel - 88 premium full-sized hammer action keys with adjustable touch response to suit your preferred playing style
  • Connectivity covered - built-in 20W speakers, ¼” Sustain pedal input (pedal not included), ¼” stereo headphone output for private practice, included power adapter and ¼” stereo outputs
  • Powerful educational features - standard, split, layer, record and Lesson modes with 128-note max polyphony and built in FX: chorus, reverb, modulation
  • Learn piano today - Includes skoove 3 month premium subscription for expert interactive online piano lessons

Last update on 2022-12-05 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Very versatile
  • Comes with many playing modes
  • Has a packed sound library
  • Realistic weight
  • Affordable
Cons
  • The key texture could be better

Quick Rundown of the Williams Legato III

Williams Legato 88-Key Digital Piano Level 2 190839037947
  • 88 semi-weighted keys, 5 rich sounds: piano, electric piano, organ, synth and bass. Battery operation: 6 x D-cell 1.5V batteries.
  • Convenient, built-in metronome
  • Built-in speakers, Stereo/mono line out jacks, USB MIDI connections.
  • AC Power adapter, Sustain Pedal, Batteries, Stand or bench are Sold separately

Last update on 2022-12-05 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Easy to bring around
  • Affordable
  • Great for beginners
  • Decent piano tones
  • Comes with many effects
Cons
  • Not the most versatile piano
  • Not enough polyphony

Product Videos

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5/5 - (1 vote)