Casio PX-770 Vs 780: What’s The Difference Between These Two Digital Pianos?

I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. Read more

Learn all the differences between these two models and which one is the better option in this Casio PX-770 vs 780 review.

Choosing a winner in this Casio PX-770 vs 780 comparison was pretty tough, but in the end I had to choose the PX-780, solely because of its varied sound library and more sophisticated features.

With that said, I’m still on the fence when it comes to the price difference between these two models. In my research, I found that the PX-780 didn’t have that many extra features when compared to the significantly cheaper PX-770.

So, if you’re a beginner on a budget, the Casio PX-770 offers a great set of features at a much lower price than the Casio PX-780.

But with a sound library of 240 different voices and a great sequencer feature, the Casio PX-780 definitely offers more versatility. If you’re a more advanced pianist or a student looking to invest in a model with more features, the Casio PX-780 is a great option, but keep in mind that it’s only slightly better than the PX-770, which is over $100 cheaper.

Casio PX-770 vs 780: Comparison Chart

Image
The Winner (#1)
Casio PX-780 Privia 88-Key Digital Home Piano with Power Supply, Black
The Runner-Up (#2)
Casio PX-770 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
Model
Casio PX-780
Casio PX-770
Number of keys
88
88
Hammer action
Scaled Hammer Action
Scaled Hammer Action
Split mode
Polyphony
128
128
Effects
Reverb, Chorus, Brilliance, DSP
4 x Reverb, 4 x Chorus, 3 x Brilliance
Speakers
2 x 5.1" woofers, 2 x 2" tweeters
2 x 4.7" woofers, 2 x 1.5" tweeters
Pedal
Three-pedal unit
Three-pedal unit
MIDI
USB
USB
Number of voices
240
19
Touch response
3 levels
3 types
Weight
69.54 lbs
69.4 lbs
Auto recording
17-track sequencer
2-track
Headphone input
2 x TS, 2 x TRS
2 x ¼’’ TRS
Lesson mode
Tone generation
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
What I like
Price
$999.00
$899.00
The Winner (#1)
Image
Casio PX-780 Privia 88-Key Digital Home Piano with Power Supply, Black
Model
Casio PX-780
Number of keys
88
Hammer action
Scaled Hammer Action
Split mode
Polyphony
128
Effects
Reverb, Chorus, Brilliance, DSP
Speakers
2 x 5.1" woofers, 2 x 2" tweeters
Pedal
Three-pedal unit
MIDI
USB
Number of voices
240
Touch response
3 levels
Weight
69.54 lbs
Auto recording
17-track sequencer
Headphone input
2 x TS, 2 x TRS
Lesson mode
Tone generation
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
What I like
Price
$999.00
More info
The Runner-Up (#2)
Image
Casio PX-770 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
Model
Casio PX-770
Number of keys
88
Hammer action
Scaled Hammer Action
Split mode
Polyphony
128
Effects
4 x Reverb, 4 x Chorus, 3 x Brilliance
Speakers
2 x 4.7" woofers, 2 x 1.5" tweeters
Pedal
Three-pedal unit
MIDI
USB
Number of voices
19
Touch response
3 types
Weight
69.4 lbs
Auto recording
2-track
Headphone input
2 x ¼’’ TRS
Lesson mode
Tone generation
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
What I like
Price
$899.00
More info

Last update on 2022-10-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Casio PX-770 vs 780: The Features

Since these two pianos are from the same brand and product line, it was really fun to compare the different features. And despite being the more expensive option, the Casio PX-780 was the definitive winner in only one category: tone. In terms of the other categories, the PX-780 was actually tied with the PX-770, with the final score being 3-2, in favor of the PX-780.

So, despite the price difference, the PX-780 only won by one point. While that still makes it the better option, it also makes the PX-770 worth considering if you’re looking to save money and still access a bunch of cool features.

Feel

The winner: Tie

Arguably the most important feature of any digital piano is the feel, or how closely it resembles an acoustic piano. And in this regard, both the PX-770 and the PX-780 offer the same feel. In fact, when testing out these options myself, I could barely tell the difference between the two.

+Hammer Action

Both of these pianos come with scaled hammer action, which is largely considered the gold standard for digital pianos. If you’re looking for a quality digital piano, at the very least, it should feature some form of scaled hammer action.

With scaled hammer action pianos, the keys on the left side are heavier than the ones on the right, which is similar to how an acoustic piano feels. That way, you get a more realistic feel on the digital piano which will make it much easier for you to switch between acoustic and digital options.

When learning the piano for the first time, it will help you out a lot if you have an instrument with scaled hammer action. While it might be heavy on your fingers and it will take some time to adjust to the weight, it is well worth it in the end.

On top of that, both pianos have adjustable touch response, so you can always tweak the settings if you have lighter or heavier hands than usual.

Casio PX-770 in white color
Casio PX-770 in white color

+Key Texture

Another cool feature of both of these pianos are the textured keys. Of course, it would have been nice if either of these pianos featured real wooden keys, but that would have bumped up the price significantly. With that said, since the PX-780 is the more expensive option, it would have been nice to see real wooden keys.

However, even if these pianos have plastic keys, Casio went out of their way to ensure that they still featured realistic key texture. To do this, they coated each of the keys with a special coating to simulate the texture of ebony and ivory.

Granted, there is still a noticeable difference between these plastic keys and real wooden keys. However, it is much less noticeable than on digital pianos with glossy plastic keys.

Tone

The winner: Casio PX-780

While both of these pianos use the same tone generator, the Casio PX-780 features a much wider sound library than the PX-770. In terms of quality, both pianos offer fairly similar tones, but since the Casio PX-770 only features 19 voices while the PX-780 comes with 240 voices, the Casio PX-780 won out in this comparison.

+Tone Generator

One advantage of choosing either of these pianos are the tones. Since these pianos run on the Casio AiR Sound Source, all the voices are of the highest quality, especially the piano voices.

The AiR Sound Source is a processor designed to give off more realistic and bright piano voices. So, when playing either of these options, you can expect a very realistic tone that is similar to real acoustic pianos. And for their price, I have to admit these tones exceeded my expectations.

And while I noticed that the quality of the voices was almost the same, I have to admit that the voices sounded a bit better on the PX-780. With that said, that doesn’t necessarily mean the PX-780 has a better tone generator.

Instead, I figured that the higher sound quality actually came from the speakers, since the PX-780 features higher quality speakers than the PX-770.

+Sound Library

The PX-780 features a very slight advantage when it comes down to tone quality. But the real reason I declared it the winner in this comparison is it’s incredibly versatile sound library.

Most digital pianos only come with a handful of tones, since manufacturers focus on quality over quantity with digital pianos. This is why the Casio PX-770 only features 19 different voices. While this is a fairly limited selection, you can rest assured that each and every voice on the PX-770 is top-quality.

However, keep in mind that the Casio PX-780 features 240 different voices. These range from acoustic and electric piano tones to synths, bass, organ, and even some more abstract voices such as drums and SFX!

On top of that, the quality of the voices on the PX-780 is a bit better than the PX-770 because of its speaker system. So, if you’re looking for a versatile piano with a multitude of different voices, the PX-780 is the clear-cut winner.

Piano Features

Casio PX-780's control panel with LCD screen
Casio PX-780’s control panel with LCD screen

The winner: Tie

I honestly expected that the PX-780 would easily win out when it came to piano features. But since it only really features one extra playing mode while having the same effects and polyphony as the PX-770, the pianos were tied in this regard.

This isn’t a knock on the PX-780’s quality but more a testament to the PX-770’s quality. Despite being the cheaper option, the PX-770 was able to provide the same piano features of the PX-780, which is one of the reasons it’s a favorite among many different piano students.

+Playing Modes

These pianos don’t come with a wide array of playing modes. In fact, aside from the standard playing mode, the only additional mode is lesson or duet mode. With this mode, you can divide the piano into two “mini-keyboards” with the exact same pitch and timbre.

This mode is designed to make it easier for teachers and students to go through lessons. When you activate this mode, the teacher and student can play side by side, producing the same sounds without having to cross over.

Both pianos also feature a recording mode, but the PX-780 admittedly has a better recording function. While the PX-770 can support up to two-track MIDI recording, the PX-780 features a 17-track sequencer.

Now, if you’re a beginner or even a recording musician, you won’t be using all 17 tracks on the sequencer since there are many different recording options using computers that offer even more versatility. With that said, the sequencer is still a nice feature to have some musicians.

+Polyphony

Both pianos feature the same polyphony, with a 128-note maximum. This is enough to handle most piano pieces and is considered the ideal polyphony for any pianist. Again, since the PX-780 is more expensive, it would have been nice to see 256-note polyphony, but sadly this feature isn’t present.

Casio PX-770 polyphony

Casio PX-770 vs 780: The Similarities

As two digital console pianos by the same brand, these models feature a lot of similarities. For example, they have the same tone generator and hammer action system, which are both considered top-quality in the piano community.

Additionally, they come with a similar set of effects. On both pianos, you can apply chorus, brilliance, and reverb effects. As a beginner, you probably don’t want to distract yourself with all these effects, but it admittedly gives you more control over your tone. On top of that, it also gives you a lot of room for experimentation.

Quick Rundown of the Casio PX-770

Casio PX-770 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
  • Dimensions: 54.76" x 11.77" x 31.42" | Weight: 69.45 lbs
  • The Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard has an incredible feel and captures the dynamics of a performance with unparalleled speed and accuracy
  • Includes a powerful stereo amplification system offering an optimal listening experience that is crystal-clear across the entire audio spectrum
  • Duet Mode splits the piano into two equal pitch ranges, allowing a student and teacher to sit at the same instrument
  • Concert Play allows you to play along with ten recordings of well-known orchestral pieces

Last update on 2022-10-04 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • More affordable than the Casio PX-780
  • The AiR Tone Generator produces very realistic and rich tones
  • Decent sound library
  • Has a 3-pedal footswitch
  • Great feel and playability with scaled hammer action and textured keys
Cons
  • Only has 19 different voices
  • The speakers could be better

Quick Rundown of the Casio PX-780

Casio PX-780 Privia 88-Key Digital Home Piano with Power Supply, Black
  • The AiR engine provides highly-accurate grand piano sounds with seamless dynamics for a remarkably expressive and powerful performance
  • The Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard has an incredible feel and captures the dynamics of a performance with unparalleled speed and accuracy
  • 250 instrument tones from strings to brass to drums are built-in, and you can store your favorite splits and layers for live performance
  • Also has 180 drum patterns with full auto accompaniment and a 17 track recorder for composing your own songs
  • Ready for the stage or studio, ¼" audio outputs easily connect the PX-780 to recording and sound reinforcement equipment

Last update on 2022-10-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Features an incredibly wide tone library with over 240 different voices
  • Runs on the AiR Sound Source of Casio
  • Comes with a 3-pedal foot switch
  • Equipped with duo mode for piano lessons
  • Has a 17-track sequencer for recording
Cons
  • Relatively expensive

Product Videos

References

5/5 - (1 vote)