Yamaha DGX-660 vs Casio PX-360: Which Is the Better Piano?

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Learn the differences and advantages of both instruments in this Yamaha DGX-660 vs Casio PX-360 review.

There’s a high chance that you’ll find yourself choosing between a Yamaha or Casio model when shopping for digital pianos. These are easily some of the best digital piano manufacturers on the market, and you’re sure to get a good model from these brands.

But in this Yamaha DGX-660 vs Casio PX-360 comparison, we’re only looking at two particular models. These pianos fall within the same price range, come with similar features, and make for a great comparison.

And after rigorous tests and tons of research, I found that the Casio PX-360 is the better option. This is the more modern piano, so it comes with features more suited to the modern pianist.

Though, depending on your needs and preferences, you might actually prefer the DGX-660.

That’s why I’ll get into the details, features, and benefits of both pianos below. That way, you get a clear picture of the DGX-660 and the PX-360, making it much easier to choose the best piano for your needs.

Yamaha DGX-660 vs Casio PX-360: Comparison Chart

Image
The Winner (#1)
Casio PX-360BK 88-Key Digital Piano with Power Supply Black large 1
The Runner Up (#2)
YAMAHA DGX660B 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano With Furniture Stand, Black
Model
Casio PX-360
Yamaha DGX-660
Product line
Privia
DGX
Product type
Portable Digital Piano
Portable Grand Piano
Number of keys
88
88
Hammer action
Tri-sensor Scaled Hammer Action II
GHS
Split mode
Polyphony
256
192
Effects
Reverb, Chorus, Delay, String & Damper Resonance
Reverb
Dual mode
Pedal
Number of voices
340 Presets
151 + 15 Drum/SFX Kits + 388 XGlite
Auto recording
Tone generation
AiR Sound Source
Pure CF Sound Engine
What I like
Price
$999.00
$999.99
The Winner (#1)
Image
Casio PX-360BK 88-Key Digital Piano with Power Supply Black large 1
Model
Casio PX-360
Product line
Privia
Product type
Portable Digital Piano
Number of keys
88
Hammer action
Tri-sensor Scaled Hammer Action II
Split mode
Polyphony
256
Effects
Reverb, Chorus, Delay, String & Damper Resonance
Dual mode
Pedal
Number of voices
340 Presets
Auto recording
Tone generation
AiR Sound Source
What I like
Price
$999.00
More infor
The Runner Up (#2)
Image
YAMAHA DGX660B 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano With Furniture Stand, Black
Model
Yamaha DGX-660
Product line
DGX
Product type
Portable Grand Piano
Number of keys
88
Hammer action
GHS
Split mode
Polyphony
192
Effects
Reverb
Dual mode
Pedal
Number of voices
151 + 15 Drum/SFX Kits + 388 XGlite
Auto recording
Tone generation
Pure CF Sound Engine
What I like
Price
$999.99
More infor

Last update on 2023-02-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Yamaha DGX-660 vs Casio PX-360: A Head-to-Head Comparison

I looked at all the features of these pianos. However, I chose three main comparison points to help me find the best instrument – the tone, feel, and piano features. These are arguably the most important characteristics of a digital piano, and they should be your main considerations when buying one for yourself.

Based on these comparison points, the Casio PX-360 wins with a score of 2-1. As you can tell, it was a very close fight, and it really could have gone either way. I’ll explain this further in the section below, so keep reading to get a better idea of why the Casio PX-360 is better than the Yamaha DGX-660.

Tone

The winner: Yamaha DGX-660

Whenever you test a digital piano, the tone should be the first thing you check out. The tone is the way a piano sounds, and it’s probably the most important feature of any digital piano. And when I compared the tones of the Yamaha DGX-660 against the Casio PX-360, choosing a winner was really easy.

The Yamaha DGX-660 has a more sophisticated tone engine and comes with more voices. So, it gives you better voice quality and more options when playing various musical styles. This is why I ended up giving this point to the Yamaha piano.

Yamaha DGX-660 comes with more voices
Yamaha DGX-660 comes with more voices

+Tone Generation

One thing you can rely on when buying a Yamaha digital piano is that the tone will be top-tier. And luckily, the Yamaha DGX-660 is no exception. This piano comes with the Pure CF Sound Engine. While this isn’t the newest tone engine from Yamaha, it remains to be one of their best options that are ideal for just about any pianist.

This is because the Pure CF Sound Engine derives its piano tones from Yamaha CF Grand Pianos. The DGX-660 is loaded with recordings of the CF Grand Pianos, which is why you can expect a bright and rich piano sound from this instrument. And since Yamaha only used the best recording equipment to gather the samples, the piano sounds very realistic as well.

While it would have been nice to see the more modern CFX tone engine, the Pure CF Sound Engine easily beats out the AiR Sound Source, which you will find on the Casio PX-360. The AiR Sound Source does produce fairly realistic tones, but when compared to the Yamaha, it doesn’t hold up.

Don’t get me wrong – you can still get great tone from the Casio PX-360. But if you’re looking for the best tone quality between these two pianos, you’re much better off with the Yamaha DGX-660.

+Sound Library

Another reason the Yamaha DGX-660 won the tone comparison is because of its sound library. As a modern pianist, it’s important to have many sound options to play different genres. And with the Yamaha DGX-660, you have all the voices you will ever need and a whole lot more.

This piano comes with over 550 different sounds you can use. This includes a wide range of piano tones, electric piano tones, organs, strings, and even drum sounds. So, you won’t run out of options when using the DGX-660.

That said, keep in mind that not all of the tones come from the Pure CF Sound Engine. This is why when I conducted the tone tests for these pianos, I noticed that some of the Yamaha’s voices weren’t as realistic or high-quality as others.

However, when compared to the Casio PX-360, the Yamaha piano still wins. The Casio PX-360 has a lot of voices, with over 300 presets to choose from. While this is good, it doesn’t compare to the versatility and flexibility you get with the Yamaha DGX-660.

Feel

The winner: Casio PX-360

The next comparison point was the feel. It’s best to get a digital piano that replicates the feel of an acoustic piano. And between these two options, the Casio PX-360 wins. Even if the hammer action systems are very similar, the Casio PX-360 goes the extra mile with textured keys, which is why it feels more realistic than the Yamaha DGX-660.

Casio PX-360 is always ready to take the stage
Casio PX-360 is always ready to take the stage

+Hammer Action

The hammer action systems on both pianos are some of the best you will find in this price range. The Yamaha DGX-660 comes with the Graded Hammer Standard or GHS. On the flip side, the Casio PX-360 comes with Tri-Scaled Hammer Action II.

While they have different names, these hammer action systems aim to accomplish the same goal. The difference between these hammer actions and those on other digital pianos is that the weight is graded.

This means that the lower keys will be significantly heavier than the higher keys. This is the same way a traditional acoustic piano is set up and adds a whole new layer of realism when playing the pianos.

But even if I found that the hammer action systems of both pianos are basically tied, the Casio PX-360 wins because of the key texture. Both pianos have plastic keys, but the Casio has a specific coating on the white and black keys to simulate the texture of ebony and ivory.

The Yamaha DGX-660 only has a coating on the black keys. So, you will immediately notice the glossy and plastic texture on the white keys. Most beginners won’t notice this small difference. But once you get familiar with the feel of acoustic pianos, the difference is more evident.

This is a very small detail, but when comparing pianos of this caliber, there are very fine margins. And for this reason, the Casio PX-360 takes the point.

Piano Features

The winner: Casio PX-360

The Casio PX-360, as the more modern option, has better piano features. To start, it has a touchscreen display that you can use to navigate through the different modes, tweak the effects, and more. The Yamaha DGX-660 also has a display, but it is far from the functionality you get from Casio’s display.

On top of that, the Casio PX-360 has way more polyphony. This piano allows you to play up to 256 notes simultaneously, which easily beats out the 192 notes on the Yamaha DGX-660. This means that you can be much more expressive and be more flexible in your playing when you opt for the Casio PX-360 over the Yamaha DGX-660.

But it doesn’t end there. Aside from the polyphony and the display, the Casio PX-360 also has more effects. This gives you more control over your tone and is great for pianists that like to tweak the sound of their instrument while playing.

5.3" touchscreen display of Casio PX-360
5.3″ touchscreen display of Casio PX-360

Yamaha DGX-660 vs Casio PX-360: The Similarities

While these two pianos are very different from each other, they still share a lot of similarities. For example, these are both portable digital pianos designed to be brought around. So, whether you need a piano for gigs, practice, or piano lessons, these instruments have you covered.

On top of that, these are easily two of the best pianos in their price range. While they aren’t exactly cheap, they offer a lot of value for the money. You can compare either of these pianos with instruments in much higher price ranges, and they will still hold their own.

And while I dubbed the Casio PX-360 the winner in this comparison, both instruments will definitely serve you well. If you’re looking for a flexible and very functional digital piano to use for different applications, you can’t go wrong with either option.

However, if you want a more modern instrument, you might want to go for the Casio PX-360.

Quick Rundown of the Yamaha DGX-660

YAMAHA DGX660B 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano With Furniture Stand, Black
  • The Pure CF Sound Engine faithfully reproduces the tone of a meticulously sampled and highly acclaimed Yamaha concert grand piano
  • GHS weighted action is heavier in the low register and lighter in the high, just like an acoustic piano
  • Score display puts music notation of MIDI songs on the screen, helping you play your favorites by following the bouncing ball
  • The Piano room lets you choose from a variety of pianos and acoustic settings to create your own personal piano environment
  • The 6 track recorder allows you to capture your performances and song ideas, then add additional layers to spice up your pieces

Last update on 2023-02-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Comes with split, dual, and lesson modes
  • Comes with a wide sound library
  • Has the Graded Hammer Standard
  • Portable and flexible
  • Top quality tones from the Pure CF Sound Engine
Cons
  • The key texture could be better
  • Doesn’t have a touch-screen display

Quick Rundown of the Casio PX-360

Casio PX-360BK 88-Key Digital Piano with Power Supply Black large 1
  • Controlled via the Color Touch Interface, an intuitive, full-color touch display that allows you to explore all the piano's functions with ease
  • The Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard has an incredible feel and captures the dynamics of a performance with unparalleled speed and accuracy
  • The AiR engine provides highly-accurate grand piano sounds with seamless dynamics for a remarkably expressive and powerful performance
  • Includes 550 Tones, from expressive guitars and basses to strings, drums, and much more, all polished with a powerful effect system
  • Accompany your playing with over 200 Rhythms that cover a wide spectrum of musical styles, or use the Rhythm Editor to customize your own

Last update on 2023-02-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Touch-screen display
  • Great hammer action
  • Textured keys
  • Comes with many tones
  • Decent sound quality
Cons
  • Tones aren‘t as rich as the Yamaha DGX-660
  • Could have more voices

Product Video

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