Casio PX-770 Vs Yamaha DGX-660: Should You Get A Portable Or Console Digital Piano?

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In this Casio PX-770 vs Yamaha DGX-660 review, we’ll discuss why it might be better for you to invest in the portable Yamaha model, especially if you’re a beginner.

The portable vs console digital piano debate is one that is ever-present in the piano community. And in this Casio PX-770 vs Yamaha DGX-660 comparison, the debate rings on.

In the world of console digital pianos, the Casio PX-770 is one of my favorites. It’s affordable, comes with a bunch of different features, and comes with a rich sound library that beats out many others in its price range.

So, if you’re looking for an affordable top-tier console digital piano, you can’t do much better than the Casio PX-770.

However, to my surprise, it was no match for the versatility of the Yamaha DGX-660, which is portable, has an incredibly vast sound library, and features premium tones.

While it may be the more expensive option, if you’re a beginner looking for versatility, the Yamaha DGX-660 might just be a better investment than the Casio PX-770.

Casio PX-770 vs Yamaha DGX-660: Comparison Chart

Image
The Winner (#1)
YAMAHA DGX660B 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano With Furniture Stand, Black
The Runner-up (#2)
Casio PX-770 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
Model
Yamaha DGX-660
Casio PX-770
Number of keys
88
88
Hammer Action
GHS (Graded Hammer Standard)
Scaled Hammer Action
Split Mode
Polyphony
192
128
Effects
Reverb, Chorus, DSP, Master EQ, IAC
4 x Reverb, 4 x Chorus, 3 x Brilliance
Speakers
Two 12 cm x 5 cm speakers
2 x 4.7" woofers, 2 x 1.5" tweeters
Pedal
Three-pedal unit
three-pedal unit
Dual Mode
Number of voices
151
19
Touch Response
Soft, Medium, Hard, Fixed
3 types
Weight
46 lbs
69.4 lbs
Auto Recording
Yes, 6-track
Yes, 2-track
Headphone Input
Standard Headphone Jack
2 x ¼’’ TRS
Lesson Mode
Tone Geration
Pure CF Sound Engine
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
What I like
Price
Price not available
$849.00
The Winner (#1)
Image
YAMAHA DGX660B 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano With Furniture Stand, Black
Model
Yamaha DGX-660
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
GHS (Graded Hammer Standard)
Split Mode
Polyphony
192
Effects
Reverb, Chorus, DSP, Master EQ, IAC
Speakers
Two 12 cm x 5 cm speakers
Pedal
Three-pedal unit
Dual Mode
Number of voices
151
Touch Response
Soft, Medium, Hard, Fixed
Weight
46 lbs
Auto Recording
Yes, 6-track
Headphone Input
Standard Headphone Jack
Lesson Mode
Tone Geration
Pure CF Sound Engine
What I like
Price
Price not available
More info
The Runner-up (#2)
Image
Casio PX-770 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
Model
Casio PX-770
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
Scaled Hammer Action
Split Mode
Polyphony
128
Effects
4 x Reverb, 4 x Chorus, 3 x Brilliance
Speakers
2 x 4.7" woofers, 2 x 1.5" tweeters
Pedal
three-pedal unit
Dual Mode
Number of voices
19
Touch Response
3 types
Weight
69.4 lbs
Auto Recording
Yes, 2-track
Headphone Input
2 x ¼’’ TRS
Lesson Mode
Tone Geration
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
What I like
Price
$849.00
More info

Last update on 2022-05-22 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Casio PX-770 vs Yamaha DGX-660: The Features

To find out the winner between these two pianos, I decided to compare the features head to head. And while the Casio PX-770 was close behind in each of these comparisons, the final score was 2-1 in favor of the Yamaha DGX-660.

And in this section, we’ll be diving into the fine details on how the Yamaha DGX-660 won out over the Casio PX-770.

Yamaha DGX-660's overview
Yamaha DGX-660’s overview

Tone

The winner: Yamaha DGX-660

Since the Yamaha DGX-660 is the more expensive model, I expected it to have a wider sound library. And while that was true, I was surprised at how well the cheaper Casio PX-770 held up in terms of sound quality.

And in the end, if it weren’t for the versatile sound library of the DGX-660, these two pianos would have been tied in terms of tone.

+Tone Generation

The Casio PX-770 features the AiR Sound Source. If you’re looking for a good digital piano that produces very realistic piano tones, any Casio model with the AiR Sound Source is a good investment.

The AiR Sound Source uses AI technology to ensure the sound waves travel through the air the same way acoustic piano sound waves travel. That way, you end up getting a very realistic sound that can rival many other models in its price range. In fact, the tone quality on the Casio PX-770, it’s comparable to the sound on the DGX-660, which is far more expensive.

With that said, the DGX-660’s premium price also comes with a premium sound engine. This piano uses the Pure CF Sound Engine, which takes its tones from the high-quality Yamaha CF concert grand pianos.

So, as expected, the DGX-660 produces a wide array of rich tones that sound very close to an acoustic piano.

+Sound Library

While these two models were very close in terms of tone generation and sound quality, the Casio PX-770 could not compare with the sound library of the DGX-660.

The Casio PX-770 comes with 19 different voices. Now, for a digital piano, this is actually a fair amount. With this model, you can experiment with a variety of different organ, synth, bass, strings, and acoustic and electric piano sounds. This is more than enough for a beginner, and is one of the reasons this console digital piano is highly recommended for any beginner or even novice piano player.

With that said, you get hundreds of different voices on the DGX-660. With the DGX-660, you get 155 different premium voices to choose from. These are in the same categories as the Casio PX-770, the only difference is that you have more choices in each category.

On top of that, the DGX-660 features a wide array of different MIDI voices, drums, and SFX. While these sounds won’t be as high-quality as the original 151 tones on the piano, most pianists will still find some use for these tones.

Feel

Casio PX-770's overview
Casio PX-770’s overview

The winner: Casio PX-770

In terms of feel, I was actually surprised that the Casio PX-770 offered a more realistic and premium feel than the Yamaha DGX-660. While the hammer action on these two models were the same, the main difference was in the key texture. And since the Casio PX-770’s keys feature a textured coating, it offered a slightly more realistic feel than the DGX-660.

+Hammer Action

The Casio PX-770 features regular scaled hammer action while the Yamaha DGX-660 features the Graded Hammer Standard (GHS). Both of these systems accomplish the same thing. On either piano, the left side will be significantly heavier than the right side, which is the same way other digital pianos are set up.

The difference in hammer action between these two pianos is very minimal. In fact, when testing them out myself, I could barely tell the difference between the two.

Both of these pianos offer very realistic hammer action. However, since the Casio PX-770 is the cheaper option by far, you might be better off just getting the Casio if you’re looking for a realistic feel. That way, you also get to save money.

+Key Texture

While the hammer action of both pianos was fairly similar, the main difference was in the key texture. Both models have plastic keys, but the Casio PX-770’s keys are coated.

This coating is designed to emulate the feel of real wooden keys. That way, your fingers won’t slip while playing and you get a more realistic overall playing experience. Most pianos in this price range only feature glossy piano keys, which is why the Casio PX-770 is one of the best in its price range.

The Yamaha DGX-660 doesn’t feature any coating. So, the white keys on this piano are completely glossy. However, the black keys are matted, which does a pretty good job at reducing slipping.

But at the end of the day, since the Casio PX-770 features a coating on all the keys and not just the black ones, it offered a more realistic overall feel.

Piano Features

Yamaha DGX-660 uses LCD screen
Yamaha DGX-660 uses LCD screen

The winner: Yamaha DGX-660

Since the Yamaha DGX-660 is portable and designed to be a workhorse instrument, it comes with more piano features and effects. While these are just add-ons and not exactly necessary, these features were the main reason I found the DGX-660 to be the better option over the Casio PX-770.

+Playing Modes

The Yamaha DGX-660 split, dual, and lesson mode. Luckily, these features are also available on the Casio PX-770, which shows how the Casio PX-770 regularly out performs other options in its price range.

With these modes, you can split the piano and load them with different voices on each side. With dual mode, you can blend two different voices to get a unique tone. And with lesson mode, you can split the instrument into two separate mini keyboards with the same tuning, which is ideal for people going to piano lessons.

Both of these pianos also feature recording mode. But while the Casio PX-770 only features 2-track recording, the Yamaha DGX-660 features up to six different tracks. While most beginners won’t need 6-track recording, it’s still a nice feature to have that adds another layer of versatility.

+Effects

In terms of effects, the Casio PX-770 didn’t stand a chance against the more premium Yamaha DGX-660. With that said, the Casio PX-770 features chorus, reverb, and brilliance effects. This gives you a fair amount of room to customize and produce your own unique tones, and most pianos in the same price range can’t match that versatility.

However, since the Yamaha DGX-660 is in a completely different price range, it’s able to offer even more effects. With the DGX-660, you get reverb, chorus, Master EQ, DSP, and even IAC. These are way more than the Casio PX-770 and all of these offer a great way to customize your own unique tone.

If you’re a beginner you won’t exactly need these effects, so if you’re looking to save money the Casio PX-770 will serve you just fine. But if you’re an advanced player who’s very particular about their piano tones, the extra versatility of the DGX-660 might be worth the investment.

Casio PX-770 vs Yamaha DGX-660: The Similarities

These are two very different pianos, one is a portable option (the DGX-660) while the other is designed to stay in one place. So, they won’t have as many similarities as other options on the market. On top of that, they are in very different price ranges, which is why they come with different sets of features.

However, they do feature a similar hammer action system. That way, you get a very realistic feel when playing the pianos. Additionally, they also come with the same playing modes.

It was a pretty surprising thing for me to learn that both pianos had the same playing modes, largely because the Yamaha DGX-660 is much more expensive than the Casio PX-779. This is simply a testament to the Casio PX-770’s ability to compete with models out of its price range.

And while it couldn’t win against the Yamaha DGX-660, it held its own in each and every category. So, if you’re looking to invest in a versatile piano fit for advanced musicians, the DGX-660 is the one for you.

But if you’re a beginner looking for a great console piano without busting the bank, you might be better off with the cheaper Casio PX-770.

Quick Rundown of the Casio PX-770

Casio PX-770 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
  • Dimensions: 54.76" x 11.77" x 31.42" | Weight: 69.45 lbs
  • The Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard has an incredible feel and captures the dynamics of a performance with unparalleled speed and accuracy
  • Includes a powerful stereo amplification system offering an optimal listening experience that is crystal-clear across the entire audio spectrum
  • Duet Mode splits the piano into two equal pitch ranges, allowing a student and teacher to sit at the same instrument
  • Concert Play allows you to play along with ten recordings of well-known orchestral pieces

Last update on 2022-05-22 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Come with a 3-pedal unit
  • Features 19 different voices
  • Uses the AiR sound source
  • Textured keys and graded hammer action
  • Offers a lot of versatility for the price
Cons
  • Not portable
  • The speakers could be better

Quick Rundown of the Yamaha DGX-660

YAMAHA DGX660B 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano With Furniture Stand, Black
  • The Pure CF Sound Engine faithfully reproduces the tone of a meticulously sampled and highly acclaimed Yamaha concert grand piano
  • GHS weighted action is heavier in the low register and lighter in the high, just like an acoustic piano
  • Score display puts music notation of MIDI songs on the screen, helping you play your favorites by following the bouncing ball
  • The Piano room lets you choose from a variety of pianos and acoustic settings to create your own personal piano environment
  • The 6 track recorder allows you to capture your performances and song ideas, then add additional layers to spice up your pieces

Last update on 2022-05-22 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Features a sound library with hundreds of different voices
  • Premium tones from the Yamaha Pure CF Sound Engine
  • Realistic hammer action from the GHS system
  • Comes with a wide array of piano features
  • Portable and ideal for advanced players
Cons
  • Relatively expensive
  • Doesn’t feature textured keys

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5/5 - (1 vote)