Casio PX-770 vs Kawai ES-110: Should You Get A Portable or Console Digital Piano?

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In this Casio PX-770 vs Kawai ES-110 review, we dive into the features of both pianos, so you have an easier time finding the best fit for your music!

Digital pianos come in many shapes and sizes. But if you’re buying one for the first time, one of your primary considerations is probably whether to get a portable digital piano or a console instrument. This is why there are many people who end up choosing between the Casio PX-770 and the Kawai ES-110.

The Casio is a classic console digital piano that gives you premium tones at an affordable price, while the Kawai is a versatile and portable instrument that offers a lot of value for the money.

And when I conducted my Casio PX-770 vs Kawai ES-110 comparison, the versatility of the Kawai ended up pushing it ahead of the Casio PX-770.

I loved the tones and the feel of the Casio PX-770, but I couldn’t deny the flexibility you get from the piano features and portability of the Kawai ES-110, which is why I ended up choosing the Kawai as the winner. 

In the rest of this review, I’ll explain this comparison in more detail and highlight the features of both pianos. That way, you won’t have to spend hours on end figuring out which piano is the best one for your needs!

Casio PX-770 vs Kawai ES-110: Comparison Chart

Image
The Winner (#1)
Kawai ES110 88-Key Digital Piano with Speakers - Gloss Black
The Runner-up (#2)
Casio PX-770 WH Privia Digital Home Piano, White
Model
Kawai ES-110
Casio PX-770
Number of keys
88
88
Hammer Action
Responsive Hammer Compact action
Scaled Hammer Action
Split Mode
Polyphony
192
128
Effects
Reverb, Brilliance
4 x Reverb, 4 x Chorus, 3 x Brilliance
Pedal
Three-pedal unit
Dual Mode
Number of voices
19
19
Touch Response
3 types
Audio Recording
Yes, 2-track
Headphone Input
2 x ¼’’ TRS
Lesson Mode
Two 14WSpeakers
Tone Generation
Harmonic Imaging (HI)
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
What I like
Price
$664.49
$899.00
The Winner (#1)
Image
Kawai ES110 88-Key Digital Piano with Speakers - Gloss Black
Model
Kawai ES-110
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
Responsive Hammer Compact action
Split Mode
Polyphony
192
Effects
Reverb, Brilliance
Pedal
Dual Mode
Number of voices
19
Touch Response
Audio Recording
Headphone Input
Lesson Mode
Two 14WSpeakers
Tone Generation
Harmonic Imaging (HI)
What I like
Price
$664.49
More info
The Runner-up (#2)
Image
Casio PX-770 WH Privia Digital Home Piano, White
Model
Casio PX-770
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
Scaled Hammer Action
Split Mode
Polyphony
128
Effects
4 x Reverb, 4 x Chorus, 3 x Brilliance
Pedal
Three-pedal unit
Dual Mode
Number of voices
19
Touch Response
3 types
Audio Recording
Yes, 2-track
Headphone Input
2 x ¼’’ TRS
Lesson Mode
Tone Generation
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
What I like
Price
$899.00
More info

Last update on 2023-02-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Casio PX-770 vs Kawai ES-110: A Head to Head Comparison

There were four main categories that I used as comparison points for the Casio PX-770 and the Kawai ES-110. These were the tone, feel of piano features, and versatility of the pianos. And after taking the time and researching the pianos and comparing them based on these categories, the score was 3-2 in favor of the Kawai ES-110.

There were some areas where these two pianos were tied, and the Casio PX-770 even came out on top in one category. But at the end of the day, the versatility and flexibility you get by choosing the Kawai ES-110 were why this was my top pick.

Tone

The winner: Tie

If you only judge these pianos based on the sound, you won’t be able to find a winner. This is because, in terms of tone quality and variety, these two pianos are tied. While they run on different tone generators, they produce a similar quality of sound, so neither of these pianos was able to beat out the other.

+Tone Generator

When you strip these pianos down to the basic features, they both have sample-based tone generators. Basically, this means that the pianos are loaded with pre-recorded samples of real pianos and other instruments. Then, when you press a key, you trigger these sounds, which is how most digital pianos in this price range work.

That said, you can expect higher-quality sounds with these instruments compared to a cheap digital piano. This is because both manufacturers paid attention to the equipment used to record the instruments along with their recording techniques.

That way, the pianos have a much more realistic and detailed tone.

While both pianos produce the same relative sound quality, the Casio PX-770 has a slight edge regarding the grand piano tone. Since the Casio is designed to replicate an acoustic piano, it has one top-quality grand piano tone that isn’t available on a regular portable digital piano.

Casio PX-770 in white color
Casio PX-770 in white color

+Sound Library

These pianos feature a fairly varied sound library, especially since they’re digital pianos. Most digital pianos are known to have very limited options as manufacturers focus on quality over quantity with these products. However, I was pretty surprised to find that both pianos have 19 different voices in their sound libraries, which gives you a lot of tonal variety.

You can choose between traditional pianos and electric pianos, strings, bass, and even organ tones with these instruments. That way, you can play various genres of music and different styles with a singular piano.

Again, neither of the pianos has the same sound library as an arranger digital piano, but they beat out many options in the same price range.

Feel

The winner: Casio PX-770

For many people, feel is the most important characteristic of a digital piano. And between the Casio PX-770 and the Kawai ES-110, the Casio felt much more realistic. As a console digital piano, the Casio already looks more like an acoustic option, but because of its great hammer action system, it also feels like one.

+Hammer Action

The Kawai ES-110 has a great set of weighted keys with responsive hammer action. This means that aside from replicating the resistance of pressing on an acoustic piano, it also has a counterweight system so that the keys spring back as they do on a premium acoustic piano.

While this was great, I preferred the scaled hammer action system on the Casio. This is because, aside from having a decent bounce-back when you press the keys, you will notice that Casio’s bass keys are slightly heavier than the treble keys.

This is a small detail that separates your typical digital pianos from the stand-out models. If realism is your top priority when shopping for a digital piano, I have to say that the Casio does it significantly better than the Kawai ES-110.

Kawai ES110 is the perfect portable piano
Kawai ES110 is the perfect portable piano

Piano Features

The winner: Kawai ES-110

When it came down to the piano features, particularly the polyphony and effects sets, I chose the Kawai. The ES-110 is designed to be a versatile piano, which is why you can expect more features on this model compared to the Casio PX-770.

+Polyphony

Polyphony refers to a digital piano’s ability to play multiple notes at the same time. The Kawai has a 196-note polyphony, which is significantly better than the 128-note polyphony on the Casio.

While you’ll never find a piece that requires you to play 196 notes at the same time, it does come in handy when adding emotions to your playing. Remember, it’s not just the keys you’re pressing you need to worry about. If you engage the sustain pedal, then you have to count the notes being sustained as well as the ones you’re pressing down.

And if you’re stacking notes on top of each other with the sustain pedal down, then you need more polyphony. This is where the Kawai ES-110 truly shines and why I find it to be one of the top models in its price range right now.

+Effects

When it came to the effects, these pianos were about tied. This is because the pianos don’t exactly have exceptional effects sets, but they had a couple of effects that give you some control over your tone.

The Kawai came with reverb and brilliance effects. The Casio also has these effects, but you also have a couple of chorus presets to play around with. That said, the chorus effects aren’t that great, which is something to note if you plan on playing musical styles that require chorus effects.

Kawai ES110 with built-in Bluetooth MIDI
Kawai ES110 with built-in Bluetooth MIDI

Versatility

The winner: Kawai ES-110

The last comparison point I had when reviewing these pianos was versatility. And there was no way that the Casio PX-770 is more versatile than the Kawai ES-110. The Kawai model is designed to bring it with you to jams, lessons, or even performances.

If you’re a beginner, it’s best to have a piano that can do many jobs. That way, it’s easier to explore different areas and styles of music. And if this is something you want to do, then you’d be much better off than the Kawai ES-110.

Casio PX-770 vs Kawai ES-110: The Similarities

These are two completely different pianos, so it’s fair to assume that they don’t share that many similarities. As mentioned earlier, they have different tone engines, hammer action systems, and overall designs. However, when you look closely, you might notice some similarities you won’t have caught at first glance.

For example, while tone engines have different names, they still rely primarily on samples to produce sounds. Additionally, these pianos offer great value for the money. While I found the Kawai ES-110 to be more versatile, you get a huge bang for your buck with either model, which is why they are some of the best beginner pianos on the market.

Quick Rundown of the Casio PX-770

Casio PX-770 WH Privia Digital Home Piano, White
  • The AiR engine provides highly-accurate grand piano sounds with seamless dynamics for a remarkably expressive and powerful performance
  • The Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard has an incredible feel and captures the dynamics of a performance with unparalleled speed and accuracy
  • Includes a powerful stereo amplification system offering an optimal listening experience that is crystal-clear across the entire audio spectrum
  • Duet Mode splits the piano into two equal pitch ranges, allowing a student and teacher to sit at the same instrument
  • Concert Play allows you to play along with ten recordings of well-known orchestral pieces

Last update on 2023-02-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Great for people looking for a realistic digital piano
  • One of the best console pianos on a budget
  • Realistic feel
  • Great sound quality
  • A varied set of tones
Cons
  • Bulky and hard to move around
  • Not that versatile

Quick Rundown of the Kawai ES-110

Sale
Kawai ES110 88-Key Digital Piano with Speakers - Gloss Black
  • 88-key Digital Stage Piano with Responsive Hammer Compact Action
  • Built-in Stereo Speaker System
  • Bluetooth MIDI pts
  • 192-note Polyphony
  • Dual Split Modes

Last update on 2023-02-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • One of the best entry-level digital pianos available
  • Comes with a range of great piano and non-piano tones
  • The responsive hammer action system provides a very realistic spring-back
  • Comes with many playing modes, 192-polyphony, and reverb and brilliance effects
  • Gives you a lot of control over your sound
Cons
  • The effects set could be better

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