Casio PX-770 Vs AP-270: Which Casio Model Wins Out?

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Find out which model is a better fit for you in this Casio PX-770 vs AP-270 review and comparison!

It can be hard to compare two digital pianos. However, since these two models are made by the same company, it was a bit easier to compare. And by the end of the Casio PX-770 vs AP-270 comparison, I found that the Casio AP-270 was the winner.

With that said, the battle was very close since the Casio PX-770 remains to be one of the best digital console pianos in its price range. But despite it’s incredibly realistic feel and great tone generation, the PX-770 couldn’t hold up against the wider sound library and higher polyphony of the AP-270.

And while I found the Casio AP-270 to be the superior option, any pianist out there will enjoy using either of these pianos. But at the end of it all, the slight advantage of the AP-270 in terms of versatility gave it the slightest edge over the competition.

Casio PX-770 vs AP-270: Comparison Chart

Image
The Winner (#1)
Casio Celviano, 88-Key Digital Pianos-Home (AP-270BK)
The Runner-up (#2)
Casio PX-770 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
Model
Casio AP-270
Casio PX-770
Number of keys
88
88
Hammer Action
Scaled Hammer Action
Scaled Hammer Action
Split Mode
Polyphony
192
128
Effects
Reverb, Chorus, Brilliance, Built-in DSP
4 x Reverb, 4 x Chorus, 3 x Brilliance
Speakers
Two, 12cm speakers
2 x 4.7" woofers, 2 x 1.5" tweeters
Pedal
Three-pedal unit
three-pedal unit
MIDI
USB
USB
Number of voices
22
19
Touch Response
3 types
3 types
Weight
80.68 lbs
69.4 lbs
Auto Recording
Yes, 2-track
Yes, 2-track
Headphone Input
2 x Standard Stereo Output
2 x ¼’’ TRS
Lesson Mode
Tone Geration
AiR Sound Source
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
What I like
Price
$1,199.00
$849.00
The Winner (#1)
Image
Casio Celviano, 88-Key Digital Pianos-Home (AP-270BK)
Model
Casio AP-270
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
Scaled Hammer Action
Split Mode
Polyphony
192
Effects
Reverb, Chorus, Brilliance, Built-in DSP
Speakers
Two, 12cm speakers
Pedal
Three-pedal unit
MIDI
USB
Number of voices
22
Touch Response
3 types
Weight
80.68 lbs
Auto Recording
Yes, 2-track
Headphone Input
2 x Standard Stereo Output
Lesson Mode
Tone Geration
AiR Sound Source
What I like
Price
$1,199.00
More info
The Runner-up (#2)
Image
Casio PX-770 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
Model
Casio PX-770
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
Scaled Hammer Action
Split Mode
Polyphony
128
Effects
4 x Reverb, 4 x Chorus, 3 x Brilliance
Speakers
2 x 4.7" woofers, 2 x 1.5" tweeters
Pedal
three-pedal unit
MIDI
USB
Number of voices
19
Touch Response
3 types
Weight
69.4 lbs
Auto Recording
Yes, 2-track
Headphone Input
2 x ¼’’ TRS
Lesson Mode
Tone Geration
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
What I like
Price
$849.00
More info

Last update on 2022-05-22 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Casio PX-770 vs AP-270: The Features

When comparing each of these piano’s features up head to head, the final score was 3-1, in favor of the Casio AP-270. However, while the Casio AP-270 won out in terms of tone and piano features, you’ll soon learn that the fight was closer than you think. And in the end, I would recommend either the Casio PX-770 and AP-270 for any beginner.

Casio AP-270 has a luxury design in white color
Casio AP-270 has a luxury design in white color

Tone

The winner: Casio AP-270

Both of these pianos use the same tone generator. The sounds from these models come from the AiR sound source, which is why both pianos have a great set of piano voices. However, since the AP-270 had a slightly more varied sound library, I chose it as the winner in this comparison.

+Tone Generator

The AiR Sound Source is one of the primary features of any Casio model. If you’re shopping for a Casio digital piano and it uses the AiR Sound Source, you’re ensured of high-quality tones that will rival any other model in its price range.

The AiR Sound Source works by playing four different samples of the same sound. This results in a more realistic tone that sounds very close to the acoustic source of the sound. The technology developed by Casio allows the sound waves to travel through the air just like it would from an acoustic piano.

Paired with the great speakers on both of these pianos, the result is a beautiful and rich piano tone. While the tones aren’t exactly identical to an acoustic piano, all it takes is one listen to figure out the quality of these pianos.

So, if you’re looking for high-quality tones, you’ll be getting just that with either of these options.

+Sound Library

The reason the Casio AP-270 won out in terms of tone isn’t because of sound quality. In fact, both of these pianos have about the same score when it comes to sound quality. However, the difference maker was the sound library.

With the Casio AP-270, you get 22 different tones. With the Casio PX-770, you only get 19 different voices. While the difference is very miniman, if you’re looking for a more versatile and flexible instrument, the Casio AP-270 has a slight edge.

With that said, you still get the same voice categories with both pianos. They both sport and feature multiple options for electric and acoustic pianos, as well as a variety of organ, strings, and bass sounds.

But if you choose the Casio AP-270 you get a couple more options when it comes to the acoustic piano sounds. This gives you more versatility and allows you to fit in a wider variety of genres.

Again, the difference is minimal, but it’s still there. So, while you get a pretty wide set of voices with the Casio PX-770, you get a few more options with the Casio AP-270.

Piano Features

The winner: Casio AP-270

Both the Casio AP-270 and the PX-770 feature the same playing modes. These different modes allow you to use the pianos in different ways, which is a great feature for any beginner and novice pianist. However, with the Casio AP-270, you have better polyphony, which is why it won out in this category as well.

+Playing Modes

Casio AP-270: Playing mode
Casio AP-270: Playing mode

Both of these pianos feature the essential playing modes: duet (lesson), dual (layering), and split mode. While some pianos have additional playing modes, as a pianist, these are really the only modes you will absolutely need when playing and performing.

Duet mode is designed for piano lessons. With this mode engaged, you divide the piano into two mini keyboards. These keyboards will trigger the same sounds and have the same pitch and timbre. So, if you’re at piano lessons, the teacher will have an easier time demonstrating different techniques. On top of that, you can play along together as if you were playing on two different pianos.

With dual mode, you can layer two voices on top of each other, which is why it’s also called layering mode. So, you can create your own unique tone combinations. And since the Casio AP-270 has more built-in voices, there are more possibilities with dual mode on this piano compared to the PX-770.

Lastly, split mode is a great performance too. When using this mode, you can assign different voices to each side of the piano. For example, you can load strings voices on the left side and piano voices on the right side. This makes it seem like you’re playing two instruments at the same time and is a great feature for any performing pianist.

Additionally, you can also record your own playing on both these pianos. However, keep in mind that these are MIDI recordings. So, they aren’t designed for studio use. Instead, you can record yourself to listen back on your playing and figure out where you need to make adjustments.

+Polyphony

The Casio AP-270 has better polyphony than the PX-770. This isn’t exactly a major difference, but it is the reason the Casio AP-270 wins out in terms of piano features.

The Casio AP-270 has 192-note maximum polyphony while the PX-770 only has 128-note maximum polyphony. When using the standard playing mode, this doesn’t make a difference. With either of the pianos, you can still play dense and spread out chords, even with the sustain pedal engaged.

However, the difference is evident when using layering mode. This is because you trigger multiple samples at a time with layering mode. And since the Casio AP-270 can handle more notes at a time, layering mode works better on this model compared to the Casio PX-770.

Again, the difference is minimal. However, since these two pianos are very similar, it’s these small differences that set them apart in the end.

Feel

The winner: Tie

When testing out these pianos myself, I found no difference in terms of feel. That’s why I declared it a tie between these two models. So, regardless of the piano you choose, you get realistic hammer action and key texture that emulates an acoustic piano very well.

+Hammer Action

Both of these pianos utilize Casio’s scaled hammer action system. In simple terms, this hammer action replicates the weight of an acoustic piano. So, you will have heavier keys on the left side compared to the right side.

Whether you’re a beginner or advanced pianist, this is a very important feature. You need to get a digital piano that emulates the feel of an acoustic piano so that you can train your muscles to handle the weight of acoustic pianos. That way, if you switch between digital and acoustic models, there won’t be too much of a difference.

On top of that, both of these pianos have the same adjustable touch response. So, you can easily tweak the settings so that it responds better to your hands. This is great for people with lighter or heavier hands since it allows them to easily tweak the piano according to their needs.

+Key Texture

Casio PX-770: Key texture
Casio PX-770: Key texture

Both pianos have textured keys. This makes them feel closer to the wooden keys on an acoustic piano. However, they both still have plastic keys so it isn’t an exact replica of the key texture of an acoustic piano.

With that said, most pianos in this price range have plastic glossy keys. These keys are very annoying for experienced pianists. And while the Casio PX-770 and AP-270 can’t perfectly match the key texture of an acoustic piano, it comes pretty close, which is more than what you can say about other models in the same range.

Casio PX-770 vs AP-270: The Similarities

There are more than a few similarities between these two models since they are made by the same brand. In terms of feel and sound quality, these two pianos are exactly the same.

Yes, the AP-270 has more voices, but it also shares a lot of voices with the Casio PX-770. Additionally, they share the same playing modes, hammer action, and even key texture.

When comparing these two pianos, it was really hard to choose a winner because they’re so similar. So, if you’re looking for a piano with great tones and feel, then either option will serve you well.

And even though the AP-270 offers more versatility, the Casio PX-770 is more affordable and easier to find. So, if you aren’t too keen on the extra 3 voices and additional polyphony, you might even be better off with the PX-770 instead.

Quick Rundown of the Casio PX-770

Casio PX-770 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black
  • Dimensions: 54.76" x 11.77" x 31.42" | Weight: 69.45 lbs
  • The Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard has an incredible feel and captures the dynamics of a performance with unparalleled speed and accuracy
  • Includes a powerful stereo amplification system offering an optimal listening experience that is crystal-clear across the entire audio spectrum
  • Duet Mode splits the piano into two equal pitch ranges, allowing a student and teacher to sit at the same instrument
  • Concert Play allows you to play along with ten recordings of well-known orchestral pieces

Last update on 2022-05-22 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Realistic hammer action and key texture
  • Comes with all the important playing modes
  • Great tones from the AiR Sound Source
  • Affordable and accessible
  • Features a recording function
Cons
  • The speakers aren’t the best
  • Not as many voices as the AP-270

Quick Rundown of the Casio AP-270

Casio Celviano, 88-Key Digital Pianos-Home (AP-270BK)
  • 22 tones including two brilliant concert grand pianos, with a generous 192 notes of polyphony
  • 88 fully-weighted hammer-action keys with Casio's acclaimed Tri-Sensor II design
  • Traditional, elegant wooden cabinetry available in your choice of colors, with bench included
  • Powerful stereo speaker system plus headphone outputs for quiet play at any time
  • Class-compliant USB connects to the Casio Music Space iOS/Android app for lessons, score viewing, and more

Last update on 2022-05-22 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • A great digital console piano for the price
  • Comes with premium voices
  • Contains 22 different built-in tones
  • A variety of playing modes
  • Better polyphony than the Casio PX-770
Cons
  • More expensive than the Casio PX-770

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