Casio PX-770 vs 750: Finding the Best Budget Digital Piano

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Find out which Casio Privia model is the best pick for you in this Casio PX-770 vs 750 comparison.

Most people know that Casio’s Privia line contains some of the best console digital pianos on the market. But since the collection has so many options, it can be hard to choose one that fits your needs.

That’s why I decided to make this Casio PX-770 vs 750 comparison. These are two very similar pianos in the Privia collection that are in a similar price range, so comparing the two was really fun. But in the end, the newer Casio PX-770 won the comparison.

When testing out the pianos, I found that the Casio PX-770 sounded significantly better than the PX-750. They were basically tied in all aspects since the pianos felt similar and shared a lot of features. But since the PX-770 definitely had the better tone, it came out on top.

In this Casio PX-770 vs 750 review, I’ll explain how the PX-770 won out and the different features of each piano. That way, it’ll be much easier for you to find the best piano for your needs!

Casio PX-770 vs 750: Comparison Chart

Image
The Winner (#1)
Casio PX-770 WH Privia Digital Home Piano, White
The Runner-Up (#2)
Casio PX750 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with USB Connectivity (OLD MODEL)
Model
Casio PX-770
Casio PX-750
Number of keys
88
88
Hammer Action
Tri-Scaled Hammer Action II
Tri-Scaled Hammer Action II
Split Mode
Polyphony
128
128
Effects
4 x Reverb, 4 x Chorus, 3 x Brilliance
Reverb (4 types), chorus (4 types), brilliance, DSP (Preset for some tones)
Speakers
2 x 4.7" woofers, 2 x 1.5" tweeters
12cm x 2
Pedal
three-pedal unit
Three-pedal unit
Dual Mode
Number of voices
19
18
Touch Response
3 types
3 types
Weight
69.4 lbs
31.5kg
Auto Recording
Yes, 2-track
Headphone Input
2 x ¼’’ TRS
Lesson Mode
Tone Geration
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
Multi-dimensional Morphing AiR
What I like
Price
$899.00
Price not available
The Winner (#1)
Image
Casio PX-770 WH Privia Digital Home Piano, White
Model
Casio PX-770
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
Tri-Scaled Hammer Action II
Split Mode
Polyphony
128
Effects
4 x Reverb, 4 x Chorus, 3 x Brilliance
Speakers
2 x 4.7" woofers, 2 x 1.5" tweeters
Pedal
three-pedal unit
Dual Mode
Number of voices
19
Touch Response
3 types
Weight
69.4 lbs
Auto Recording
Yes, 2-track
Headphone Input
2 x ¼’’ TRS
Lesson Mode
Tone Geration
AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator)
What I like
Price
$899.00
More info
The Runner-Up (#2)
Image
Casio PX750 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with USB Connectivity (OLD MODEL)
Model
Casio PX-750
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
Tri-Scaled Hammer Action II
Split Mode
Polyphony
128
Effects
Reverb (4 types), chorus (4 types), brilliance, DSP (Preset for some tones)
Speakers
12cm x 2
Pedal
Three-pedal unit
Dual Mode
Number of voices
18
Touch Response
3 types
Weight
31.5kg
Auto Recording
Headphone Input
Lesson Mode
Tone Geration
Multi-dimensional Morphing AiR
What I like
Price
Price not available
More info

Last update on 2023-02-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Casio PX-770 vs 750: A Head to Head Comparison

These pianos share many similarities, so to find a winner, I had to judge them based on three categories: tone, feel, and piano features. That way, I could create a scorecard and find the most objective winner possible.

By the end of this comparison, the score was 3-2 in favor of the Casio PX-770. It was a really close fight, with the PX-750 matching the PX-770 in almost every category. That said, the PX-770 is the more modern pick which makes the PX-750 seem dated, which is how it ended up winning.

Keep reading to dive into the details of this comparison and learn about the strengths and weaknesses of either piano.

Casio PX-770 in white color
Casio PX-770 in white color

Tone

The winner: PX-770

The one category where the PX-770 was the clear winner was the tone. I believe the tone is the most important feature of any digital piano, and if you’re looking for a model for your home, you need one that sounds as close to an acoustic piano as possible. Both of these pianos have decent speaker systems, but the PX-770 has a more modern tone generator and a wider sound library. So, it produces better tones while also having more versatility.

+Tone Generator

The Casio PX-750 is a fairly old model. Upon its release, it was one of the most modern digital pianos on the market. However, a lot of time has passed since then, which makes the piano feel a bit dated. And this couldn’t be clearer than when you look at the tone generator of the Casio PX-750.

This piano uses Multi-dimensional Morphing AiR, which is an old Casio tone engine. This generator aims to reproduce how sound waves travel through the air when you plan an acoustic piano. This made the piano sound much more realistic than its competitors at the time.

But Casio has since created a better tone generator at the same price. 

This is the AiR sound source, which you can find on the PX-770. While this generator still relies on samples like the Multi-dimensional Morphing AiR, the samples are of much higher quality. This means you can expect much more clarity and brilliance when playing the PX-770.

When I conducted an ear test, it was clear as day that the AiR Sound Source was more realistic. So, if you need a piano that sounds as close to an acoustic piano as possible, the PX-770 is the better pick.

+Sound Library

Another reason the Casio PX-770 has a superior tone is its sound library. Both pianos have pretty decent sound libraries, which is nice considering they’re console digital pianos. These instruments are notorious for only having a small selection of tones, so it’s a nice change to see an 18-tone sound library on the PX-750 and a 19-tone sound library on the PX-770.

To be honest, this isn’t that much of a difference. However, the one extra tone on the Casio PX-770 makes it worth the upgrade. This is because the PX-770 features a stereo-sampled grand piano, which is missing on the PX-750.

If you want a large and grand piano tone, the Casio PX-770 has you covered. If the Casio PX-750 also had this voice, the pianos would have been tied in this category. But since the Casio PX-750 lacks a stereo-sampled grand piano, it lost out to the Casio PX-770.

The Casio PX-770 has 19 voices and gives you more choices per category
The Casio PX-770 has 19 voices and gives you more choices per category

Feel

The winner: Tie

One of the reasons the Casio PX-750 was so popular upon release was its realistic feel. This was large because of the sophisticated hammer action system on the piano. When upgrading the PX-750, Casio figured that they didn’t need to change this very realistic hammer action system, so you’ll find the same one on the Casio PX-770.

+Hammer Action

Both of these pianos feature the Tri-Scaled Hammer Action II system. This is a hammer action designed to replicate the feel of an acoustic piano. It does this by having slightly heavier keys on the lower keys that get lighter as you go up the piano. And compared to other pianos in their price range, the Casio Tri-Scaled Hammer Action performs very well.

These pianos can do this because of the Tri-Scaled Hammer action. The keys have a series of built-in sensors to detect how and when you press a key. That way, the piano plays the sample according to how you pressed the keys, creating a much more realistic feel.

Aside from the slight weight difference with the keys, these pianos also have great timing. I found that both pianos sound fairly realistic, and part of the reason for that is the slight delay from the time you hit the keys to the time you hear a note.

Piano Features

The winner: Tie

I expected the Casio PX-770 to come with more piano features since it’s an upgrade to the 750. However, that isn’t the case,slack as both pianos have great polyphony and various playing modes. So, they were also tied in this aspect, which is a testament to how the PX-750 can still compete with many modern digital pianos.

+Polyphony

I was very happy to see that both pianos have 128-note maximum polyphony. This is a great feature as it allows the piano to play up to 128 notes and sounds at the same time. This feature comes in handy when adding emotion to your playing with the sustain pedal or blending different voices with layering mode.

The high maximum polyphony on both of these pianos makes them very versatile. You can be as expressive as you want with these pianos, which is another reason why they are such great options.

Casio PX-750 features
Casio PX-750 features

+Playing Modes

These pianos have three playing modes – layer, duet, and split. These are all very useful for both beginners and advanced pianists. Duet is a mode designed for piano lessons as it divides the keyboard into two smaller pianos. This allows you and a piano instructor to play along simultaneously without needing two instruments.

Split mode divides the keyboard into two then you can assign different voices to each side. And with layering mode, you can blend two voices together to create a rich and unique tone. Casio didn’t need to add these features, but they did so to make the pianos more versatile and useful for the modern pianist.

Casio PX-770 vs 750: The Similarities

The Casio PX-770 is an upgrade to the 750, so you can expect them to share some similarities. For example, we already discussed that these two pianos share a hammer actions system. But did you know that they also have the same key texture? This is why I probably wouldn’t have been able to tell them apart if I had conducted a blind feel test.

Another similarity is that neither piano is portable. These are console digital pianos, so they are generally meant to stay in place. If you need a digital piano to bring with you to gigs and performances, these pianos may not be the right option for you.

Since the Casio PX-770 is an upgrade, it comes with more premium features than the 750 and easily won the comparison. But as you noticed, the PX-750 was able to hold its own against the modern upgrade fairly easily, which just shows the staying power of Casio pianos.

Quick Rundown of the Casio PX-770

Casio PX-770 WH Privia Digital Home Piano, White
  • The AiR engine provides highly-accurate grand piano sounds with seamless dynamics for a remarkably expressive and powerful performance
  • The Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard has an incredible feel and captures the dynamics of a performance with unparalleled speed and accuracy
  • Includes a powerful stereo amplification system offering an optimal listening experience that is crystal-clear across the entire audio spectrum
  • Duet Mode splits the piano into two equal pitch ranges, allowing a student and teacher to sit at the same instrument
  • Concert Play allows you to play along with ten recordings of well-known orchestral pieces

Last update on 2023-02-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • One of the best budget-friendly console digital pianos
  • Great from the AiR sound source
  • A worthy upgrade to the Casio PX-750
  • Features a 3-pedal unit
  • Very realistic hammer action system
Cons
  • Heavy, bulky, and hard to move
  • The sound library could be more varied

Quick Rundown of the Casio PX-750

Casio PX750 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with USB Connectivity (OLD MODEL)
  • Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action with Ebony and Ivory Keys
  • Included matching stand with 3 pedals
  • 18 Tones with Split / Layer Capability
  • 128 Note Polyphony
  • Class Compliant USB MIDI

Last update on 2023-02-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • One of Casio’s best console digital pianos for beginners
  • Easy to use
  • Has a great hammer action system
  • Decent voices
  • Comes with various playing modes
Cons
  • Feels dated compared to the PX-770
  • has a limited tone library

Product Video

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