Alesis Recital Pro vs Korg B2 Comparison: Which Digital Piano Should You Get?

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Korg is one of the most well-known digital piano brands out there. Their pianos are seen on big stages all over the world. And while most of their models are known to be on the expensive side, the Korg B2 offers a durable and high-quality piano at a relatively affordable price.

The Alesis Recital Pro, on the other hand, is widely considered one of the best beginner digital pianos out there. If you’ve been on the hunt for your first digital piano, there’s a high chance you stumbled across this model once or twice.

But in this Alesis Recital Pro vs Korg B2 comparison, the Korg won out over the Alesis model. While the Recital Pro is one of the best beginner pianos out there, it couldn’t match up the voice quality and feel of the Korg B2. Comparing these two models was a joy since they both offer great features, and while the battle was close, it ended with a definite winner.

Alesis Recital Pro vs Korg B2: Comparison Chart

Image
The Winner (#1)
KORG B2SP 88-Key Digital Piano with Stand + 3 Pedal Unit bundle with Knox Gear Bench, Music Light and Focus Piano Book/CD (4 Items)
The Runner-up (#2)
Alesis Recital Pro - 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Hammer Action Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 12 Voices, Record and Lesson Mode, FX and Display
Model
Korg B2
Alesis Recital Pro
Number of keys
88
88
Hammer Action
Natural weighted action
Fully-weighted keys
Tone Generation
Stereo PCM
Sampling
Effects
Reverb, Chorus
Chorus, Modulation, Reverb
Polyphony
128
128
Layer Mode
Split Mode
Number of voices
12
12
Duo-Mode
Headphone input
Recording
MIDI
Speakers
Two 15W speakers
Two 20W Speakers
Pedal
Yes
Yes, single pedal only
What I like
Price
$649.99
$379.00
The Winner (#1)
Image
KORG B2SP 88-Key Digital Piano with Stand + 3 Pedal Unit bundle with Knox Gear Bench, Music Light and Focus Piano Book/CD (4 Items)
Model
Korg B2
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
Natural weighted action
Tone Generation
Stereo PCM
Effects
Reverb, Chorus
Polyphony
128
Layer Mode
Split Mode
Number of voices
12
Duo-Mode
Headphone input
Recording
MIDI
Speakers
Two 15W speakers
Pedal
Yes
What I like
Price
$649.99
More info
The Runner-up (#2)
Image
Alesis Recital Pro - 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Hammer Action Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 12 Voices, Record and Lesson Mode, FX and Display
Model
Alesis Recital Pro
Number of keys
88
Hammer Action
Fully-weighted keys
Tone Generation
Sampling
Effects
Chorus, Modulation, Reverb
Polyphony
128
Layer Mode
Split Mode
Number of voices
12
Duo-Mode
Headphone input
Recording
MIDI
Speakers
Two 20W Speakers
Pedal
Yes, single pedal only
What I like
Price
$379.00
More info

Last update on 2022-01-27 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Alesis Recital Pro vs Korg B2: The Differences

In my experience with pianos, I figured that one of the best ways to compare two different models is to see how the features stack up against each other. And while both of these pianos had similar features, considering they are made for the same market, the Korg B2 eventually came out on top with a score of 2-1.

The only area where the Alesis Recital Pro won out is in terms of piano features. But in terms of the tone and feel, the Korg B2 was the easy winner with a more robust tone generation system and advanced hammer action.

Feel & Playability

The winner: Korg B2

I could have easily declared the feel and playability of these two instruments a tie. Since they both have plastic glossy keys, the key texture of both instruments was a slight let down. However, since the Korg B2 uses a naturally weighted action system, I noticed that the piano felt more realistic compared to the Alesis Recital Pro, which is a big reason the Korg B2 took this point.

+ Hammer Action

 Korg B2 uses a naturally weighted action system
Korg B2 uses a naturally weighted action system

The Korg B2 uses naturally weighted hammer action. While this might seem like another marketing term, there is actually a significant difference between the Korg’s feel and the Alesis Recital Pro’s feel. The Alesis Recital Pro features fairly decent hammer action for the price. In fact, when testing out this model, I was pretty surprised with how realistic the keys felt in terms of weight.

However, my one complaint is that the hammer action wasn’t graded. The Korg B2, on the other hand, had graded hammer action, which added a new dimension of realism. With the Korg B2, I noticed that the keys on the left side of the piano were fairly heavier than the right sided, which is the same way an acoustic piano works. The Alesis Recital Pro had a uniform weight throughout all the keys, which is a subtle detail, but if you’re an experienced pianist, it makes a large difference. 

+ Key Texture

As I mentioned earlier, the key textures of these pianos left a lot to be desired. They were far from the most realistic keys out there, which is about expected since they both have glossy plastic keys. This isn’t exactly new in the price range, so I wasn’t surprised by the key texture but nonetheless, I was let down.

If you’re a beginner, there’s a high chance that you won’t notice the difference between glossy and textured keys anyway. However, the more you play the piano, the more you’ll feel that it’s fairly slippery compared to an acoustic piano. This could have easily been fixed by adding a texture on the pianos to resemble the feel of an acoustic piano. But sadly, none of these pianos have that.

+ Touch Sensitivity

The Alesis Recital Pro features the adjustable touch sensitivity
The Alesis Recital Pro features the adjustable touch sensitivity

Both pianos have adjustable touch sensitivity, so the real difference in feel and playability was in the hammer action system. With both pianos, you can adjust the touch sensitivity to your liking. So, if you have a lighter touch, you can program the piano to be more sensitive and if you have heavy hands, you can set the piano to require more pressure to trigger a sound. This adds a whole new layer of customizability and is a big reason these are considered some of the best digital pianos for beginners in the market today.

Tone

The winner: Korg B2

Aside from feel, tone is arguably the most important aspect of a digital piano. And since Korg is known for providing premium and high-quality tones in all their instruments, it was no surprise that it took the point in this regard as well. Since it uses Stereo PCM sampling, the tone quality of the voices is more realistic than the Alesis Recital Pro, which is about what is expected from the more expensive model. But with that said, the Alesis Recital Pro was still able to put up a pretty strong fight.

+ Tone Generation

On the surface level, both of these pianos seem to have the same tone generation system. Since they both use samples that are triggered whenever you press down on a key, the tones are generated in the same way. However, the main difference between these two pianos in terms of tone generation is the type of samples loaded onto the instrument.

Since the Alesis Recital Pro is a basic piano, you don’t get the most robust samples. They sound fairly digital, which is a major issue for some people, but compared to other models in its price range, I did notice that the Alesis Recital Pro’s tones were a bit more realistic. However, compared to the Korg B2’s Stereo PCM samples, the Alesis Recital Pro couldn’t match up.

Since the Korg B2 uses the Stereo PCM tone generation method, the voices on this instrument sound much more realistic. When testing out both of these instruments, the difference was minimal, but since my ears are used to the way pianos sound, I found that the Korg B2 had much more realistic voices loaded into the instrument.

+ Sound Library

Korg B2’s voices are higher quality
Korg B2’s voices are higher quality

One of the reasons I hold the Alesis Recital Pro in such a high regard is because it can easily compete with options that are more expensive. You can easily see that in the fact that both of these pianos are loaded with the same number of voices. Granted, the quality of the Korg B2’s voices are definitely better than the Alesis Recital Pro, but they both have 12 different voices for you to choose from.

For a digital piano, this is about the standard amount of voices you’ll need. You get a wide selection of different piano, strings, synth, and even bass voices, which offers a lot of versatility. However, if you’re a beginner, you’ll likely only use 2-3 of these voices. So, since the Korg B2’s voices are higher quality, you get more value when you invest in this model over the Alesis Recital Pro.

Piano Features

The winner: Alesis Recital Pro

Because of the price difference, I didn’t see the Alesis Recital Pro winning any of these categories. But when doing the research, I was honestly surprised to see that the Alesis Recital Pro offered a better set of features than the Korg B2, and in this section I’ll explain why.

+ Playing Modes

The only additional playing mode you get on the Korg B2 is duo mode. This is also known as lesson mode, and it splits the piano into two zones with the same tuning and timbre. This is designed for piano lessons so the instructor can show and demonstrate different techniques to students without crossing over to the other side. On top of that, they can also play along with the student and produce the exact same tones.

While this is a very useful feature, the Alesis Recital Pro comes with two additional playing modes on top of duo mode. These are dual and split mode, which are two very valuable features for any pianist. With dual mode, you can blend and layer two different voices at the same time. With this feature, you can create a unique tone and even tweak it so that it’s uniquely yours.

With split mode, you can assign different voices to different sides of the piano. If you’re a beginner, this might seem like a basic gimmick, but once you start performing, you’ll realize the value of this mode. For example, you can load a bass voice on the left side and a synth on the right side so you can occupy two sonic spaces, making it easier to play as a solo act or blend in with a band.

+ Connectivity

Alesis Recital Pro has MIDI connectivity
Alesis Recital Pro has MIDI connectivity

Both of these pianos offer MIDI connectivity, which is great. With MIDI connectivity you can hook up the piano to your computer or phone and use it to control virtual instruments. You can also use MIDI to hook up to interactive piano learning apps on your computer or phone, making it easier to learn how to play the instrument.

However, one complaint I had with the Korg B2 is that it did not’ support BlueTooth MIDI. It was easy to forgive this on the Alesis Recital Pro since it’s the more affordable option, but since the Korg B2 is on the pricier side, it would have been nice if it had some of these more advanced features to eliminate the need for wires.

+ Effects

Another thing that surprised me is that the Alesis Recital Pro had more built-in effects than the Korg B2. The Korg B2 only comes with reverb and chorus effects while the Alesis comes with reverb, chorus, and modulation. Granted, this doesn’t give you that much versatility over the Korg B2, but I had to give the point in favor of the Alesis Recital Pro because it offered this extra feature at a much more affordable price.

Alesis Recital Pro vs Korg B2: The Similarities

One important thing to remember about both of these pianos is that they are made for the same type of musician. If you’re looking for a good first digital piano to kickstart your journey into the instrument, both of these would be great options. On top of that, they are both fairly affordable pianos that come with a wide range of features.

For example, they both have fully-weighted 88 key keyboards that are great for students. This is because they mimic the realism of playing on an acoustic piano, which you will need when you start learning the instrument. Additionally, both of the pianos have the same amount of voices, so while the quality is slightly better on the Korg B2, they both give you the same choices when it comes to the sound.

Since the Korg B2 is the more premium model, you can expect it to come with higher-quality features such as hammer action and tone. However, despite the price disparity, the Alesis Recital Pro was able to put up a good fight, which makes either of these options great choices for beginners and piano students.

Quick Rundown of the Korg B2

KORG B2SP 88-Key Digital Piano with Stand + 3 Pedal Unit bundle with Knox Gear Bench, Music Light and Focus Piano Book/CD (4 Items)
  • BUNDLE INCLUDES: KORG B2SP 88-Key Natural Weighted Hammer Action Digital Piano with Stand and Three-Pedal Unit, Knox Gear Furniture Style Flip-Top Piano Bench (Black), Knox Gear Rechargeable Music Light (Black), and Focus on Piano - A Concise Approach to Learning & Playing (with CD)
  • SOUND ENGINE: The B2 provides a total of 12 sounds that cover a diverse range of genres, starting with five pristine piano sounds from its new piano engine, and also providing richly distinctive electric piano, organ, harpsichord, and strings. In addition to capturing the enormous tonal range of a grand piano, the meticulously-sampled sounds created for the B2 Digital Piano also reproduce the sympathetic string vibrations and damper resonances that give the piano its character
  • GERMAN PIANO SOUNDS: This world-famous German-made piano is beloved by countless pianists for its diverse range of expressive power. With stunning sonic dynamism and vibrance, its palette ranges from brilliant highs to chillingly detailed lows. The provided sounds include the majestic German concert piano and a Classic piano noted for its delicate and complex tone
  • ITALIAN PIANO SOUNDS: An Italian-made piano with beautifully bright expression and satisfying sustain. Pianists around the world are enraptured by its rich resonance and sensitive responsiveness. The sounds provided are Italian concert piano, a bright-toned Jazz piano, and a beautifully resonant Ballad piano
  • ELECTRIC PIANO SOUNDS: An e-piano reproduces the differences in tone that arise from your playing dynamics and even simulates the sound of a key-off. Conjure electric piano sounds that are instantly recognizable from decades of great music

Last update on 2022-01-27 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Comes with reverb and chorus effects
  • Comes with high-quality piano tones
  • Scaled hammer action provides a realistic feel
  • Has 12 built-in voices that offer a lot of versatility
  • MIDI connectivity available
Cons
  • Lacks some piano features and playing modes
  • More expensive than the Korg B2

Quick Rundown of the Alesis Recital Pro

Alesis Recital Pro - 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Hammer Action Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 12 Voices, Record and Lesson Mode, FX and Display
  • Start playing professional keys today - the ultimate beginners digital piano loaded with 12 expertly crafted voices and powerful educational features
  • Universal responsive feel - 88 premium full-sized hammer action keys with adjustable touch response to suit your preferred playing style
  • Connectivity covered - built-in 20W speakers, ¼” Sustain pedal input (pedal not included), ¼” stereo headphone output for private practice, included power adapter and ¼” stereo outputs
  • Powerful educational features - standard, split, layer, record and Lesson modes with 128-note max polyphony and built in FX: chorus, reverb, modulation
  • Learn piano today - Includes skoove 3 month premium subscription for expert interactive online piano lessons

Last update on 2022-01-27 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Equipped with 12 high-quality voices
  • A very affordable and functional option
  • Comes with split, dual, and duo mode
  • You can record your own playing and listen back on it
  • MIDI connectivity via USB
Cons
  • No BlueTooth connectivity
  • The hammer action wasn’t as good as the Korg B2

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References

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