Alesis Recital vs Roland GO Piano (P-61): Should You Invest In The Recital Pro?

I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. Read more

We put two pianos to the test in this Alesis Recital vs Roland GO Piano review to help you find the best option for the money!

There are many digital pianos nowadays that offer a lot of features for a low price. Two great examples of this are the Alesis Recital and Roland GO Piano. Despite being well under the $350 mark, both of these pianos perform very well and can even rival models outside of their price range.

But while both pianos are ideal beginner’s pianos, you may be wondering which one is better.

When I reviewed both pianos, I found that the Alesis Recital had a slight edge. Save for a smaller sound library, the Alesis Recital’s features were easily able to beat out the Roland GO:Piano’s offerings.

And while I think that most beginners would get more out of the Alesis Recital, the Roland GO:Piano still has its place. In this review, we’ll be explaining the pros and cons of both pianos so you can easily decide on the right instrument for your needs.

Alesis Recital vs Roland GO Piano (P-61): Comparison Chart

Image
The Winner (#1)
Alesis Recital – 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Semi Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 5 Voices, Split, Layer and Lesson Mode, FX and Piano Lessons
The Runner-Up (#2)
Roland GO:PIANO 61-key Digital Piano Keyboard with Integrated Bluetooth Speakers (GO-61P)
Model
Alesis Recital
Roland GO:Piano
Product line
Recital
GO
Product type
Portable digital piano
Portable digital piano
Number of keys
88
61
Hammer action
Semi-weighted keys
Non-weighted
Touch sensitivity
Adjustable touch response
Adjustable touch response
Tone genaration
Sampling
Sampling
Effects
Reverb, Chorus
Reverb, Chorus
Lesson mode
Dual mode
Split mode
Number of voices
5
40
Speakers
Two 20W Speakers
Dual 2.5W speakers
MIDI
Maximum polyphony
128
128
Pedal included
What I like
Price
$229.00
$299.99
The Winner (#1)
Image
Alesis Recital – 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Semi Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 5 Voices, Split, Layer and Lesson Mode, FX and Piano Lessons
Model
Alesis Recital
Product line
Recital
Product type
Portable digital piano
Number of keys
88
Hammer action
Semi-weighted keys
Touch sensitivity
Adjustable touch response
Tone genaration
Sampling
Effects
Reverb, Chorus
Lesson mode
Dual mode
Split mode
Number of voices
5
Speakers
Two 20W Speakers
MIDI
Maximum polyphony
128
Pedal included
What I like
Price
$229.00
More info
The Runner-Up (#2)
Image
Roland GO:PIANO 61-key Digital Piano Keyboard with Integrated Bluetooth Speakers (GO-61P)
Model
Roland GO:Piano
Product line
GO
Product type
Portable digital piano
Number of keys
61
Hammer action
Non-weighted
Touch sensitivity
Adjustable touch response
Tone genaration
Sampling
Effects
Reverb, Chorus
Lesson mode
Dual mode
Split mode
Number of voices
40
Speakers
Dual 2.5W speakers
MIDI
Maximum polyphony
128
Pedal included
What I like
Price
$299.99
More info

Last update on 2022-12-05 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Alesis Recital vs Roland GO Piano (P-61): What’s The Difference?

The Alesis Recital and the Roland GO:Piano are the most affordable and basic digital pianos of both brands. But even if they’re in the same price range, they have many differences. And since the Alesis Recital is full-keys, has semi-weighted keys, and comes with more playing modes, it was the easy winner.

By the end of this comparison, the Alesis Recital won out with a score of 2-1. Keep reading to learn how each piano performed when I tested all the key features.

Feel

The winner: Alesis Recital

If you’re a beginner, I’d highly suggest getting a digital piano with fully-weighted keys. That way, you simulate the feel of an actual acoustic piano and get your fingers used to the action. But if fully-weighted options are out of your price range or you really prefer non-weighted keys, the Alesis Recital gives you a great middle-ground.

While it doesn’t have fully-weighted keys, you will feel some resistance when playing this piano. The Roland GO:Piano, on the other hand, doesn’t offer the same resistance which is why the Alesis Recital took the point.

+Hammer Action

I usually don’t like pianos with semi-weighted keys. That said, compared to the non-weighted keys on the Roland:Go Piano, the semi-weighted keys one the Alesis easily win. So, when you play the Alesis Recital, you will feel some resistance on the keys but it won’t be as heavy as an acoustic piano.

This is great if you have a hard time with fully-weighted keys but don’t want a non-weighted keyboard. In this price range, most pianos are like the Roland:GO Piano and don’t have any weight on the keys. That’s just one of the reasons the Alesis Recital offers some fo the best value for the money when shopping in the sub-$300 range.

Alesis Recital has a beautifully sophisticated design
Alesis Recital has a beautifully sophisticated design

Tone

The winner: Roland GO: Piano

When it came to the sound quality, these pianos performed as expected. While they don’t offer the most realistic tones, they are good enough for practice and piano lessons. But since the Roland GO:Piano has a massive sound library compared to the Alesis Recital, the Roland GO:Piano won this category.

+Tone Generation

Don’t expect highly-sophisticated tone engines from these pianos. Since they are budget-friendly options, they use samples to generate their tones. So, both of the pianos are loaded with different recordings of various instruments that you can play by pressing a key.

The thing about sample-generated tones is that they don’t have the same realism and character as ones that come from a dedicated tone engine. However, both of these pianos have decent samples that can compete and beat out others in their price range.

At the end of the day, you get what you pay for with these pianos. The tones are decent enough for basic lessons and rehearsals. But if you’re looking for a piano to use at gigs and recordings, these might not be the best options for you.

Roland GO piano is a simple piano that’s easy to use
Roland GO piano is a simple piano that’s easy to use

+Sound Library

The reason the Roland GO:Piano took the point in this comparison was its sound library. Most of the time, digital pianos in this price range lack a varied tone library. For example, the Alesis Recital, as much as I love it, has a very limited sound library. With only five tones, you have very few options on the Alesis Recital and have to stick to the most basic tones.

The Roland:GO Piano, on the other hand, comes with 40 different tones. This includes the basics like acoustic and electric pianos and strings, along with some more abstract tones like sound effects and a drum kit.

If you want the most versatile piano on a budget, the Roland GO:Piano’s sound library makes it one of the best options. But if you only need the basic tones for practice and lessons, the Alesis Recital won’t be a bad pick either.

Piano Features

The winner: Alesis Recital

The tie-breaking comparison point for these two pianos was the piano features. More specifically, I’m talking about the various playing modes. And sadly, the Roland GO:Piano doesn’t offer much in this regard. But since the Alesis Recital has many playing modes to play around with, it ended up taking the point and winning the entire comparison.

+Playing Modes

The Alesis Recital offers lesson, dual, and split modes. Lesson mode allows you to separate the keyboard into two different pianos. That way, you and a teacher can play along simultaneously during piano lessons with one keyboard. And if you want to play piano duets with limited equipment, this is a great playing mode as well.

Another cool feature is dual mode. This mode allows you to blend any two voices on the Alesis Recital. While the piano has a very limited sound library, you can broaden the types of tones it can produce by blending two voices with dual mode.

Lastly, split mode lets you assign different voices to either side of the piano. This results in the illusion that you’re playing two instruments at the same time. This is great for playing with other musicians, performing, and just playing around and exploring the instrument.

All of these features are very useful, which is why I love the Alesis Recital Pro. When I tested out the Roland GO:Piano, I found that it didn’t come with any other playing modes. So, your options are very limited if you choose the Roland GO:Piano.

Semi-weighted keys of Alesis Recital
Semi-weighted keys of Alesis Recital

Alesis Recital vs Roland GO Piano (P-61): The Similarities

Since these are both entry-level instruments, you can expect some similarities between the two. For example, the Alesis Recital and the Roland:GO Piano are both affordable and portable. This makes them ideal for beginners who need a decent piano for lessons and practice without busting the bank.

Additionally, these pianos have the same effects and polyphony. With chorus and reverb effects and 128-note polyphony on both pianos, you can have a lot of fun experimenting and adding expression to your playing. This is a great feature for budget-friendly pianos, and is why these instruments are highly recommended for beginners.

If you’re a beginner, effects and polyphony shouldn’t concern you that much. But since both brands want you to be able to use these pianos long into your musical journey, they added these very useful and slightly advanced features. That’s why I loved reviewing and testing both options.

But as mentioned earlier, even if both pianos are great options, the Alesis Recital still offers more versatility and value for the money.

Quick Rundown of the Alesis Recital

Alesis Recital – 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Semi Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 5 Voices, Split, Layer and Lesson Mode, FX and Piano Lessons
  • An Electric Piano That’s Tailored to You - Feature-packed Electric keyboard with 88 premium full-sized semi weighted keys with adjustable touch response to suit your preferred playing style
  • Premium Sounds - 5 voices (Acoustic Piano, Electric Piano, Organ, Synth, and Bass), built-in FX: Chorus, Reverb, and two built in 20W speakers that deliver crystal-clear, room-filling sound
  • All The Right Connections - ¼” sustain pedal input (pedal not included), ¼” stereo headphone output for private practice and stereo RCA outputs for connection to speakers / amplifiers
  • Play the Keyboard Wherever You Go - Power via the included power adapter or 6 D cell batteries (not included) for professional piano performance anywhere
  • Powerful Educational Features - Standard, split, layer, and lesson modes with 128-note max polyphony and Skoove 3 month premium subscription for expert interactive online piano lessons

Last update on 2022-12-05 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Affordable and great for beginners
  • Equipped with a full 88-key keyboard
  • Lightweight, compact, and portable
  • Offers a middle-ground between fully-weighted and non-weighted keyboards
  • Built-in reverb effects
Cons
  • Lacks variety in its sound library
  • Only has semi-weighted hammer action

Quick Rundown of the Roland GO Piano

Roland GO:PIANO 61-key Digital Piano Keyboard with Integrated Bluetooth Speakers (GO-61P)
  • Premium piano performance in a compact and affordable instrument
  • 61-note keyboard with standard full-size keys and authentic touch response
  • Bluetooth audio/MIDI support for connecting with your smartphone or tablet
  • Onboard high-quality Bluetooth speakers for wireless smartphone connection
  • Compact and lightweight for playing and storing anywhere

Last update on 2022-12-05 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • One of the most affordable digital pianos available
  • Small and compact 61-key keyboard
  • Comes with a range of effects that you can use to improve your playing
  • Has a maximum polyphony of 128-notes, which is great for beginners
  • A simple piano that’s easy to use
Cons
  • This piano doesn’t have weighted keys
  • The piano comes with no additional playing modes

Product Videos

Related Articles to Alesis Recital

  1. Alesis Recital vs Williams Legato: The Best Beginner Pianos on the Market?
  2. Alesis Recital vs Thomann SP-320: Which ls the Better Piano?
  3. SDP-2 by Gear4Music vs Alesis Recital: The Best Entry-Level Digital Pianos?
  4. Alesis Recital Vs Yamaha P125: Which Is The Right Pick For You?
  5. Alesis Recital Vs RockJam 88: Which $200-Digital Piano Gives More Value?
  6. Alesis Recital Vs Yamaha NP12: Which Of The Two Suits Your Needs?
  7. Alesis Recital Vs Yamaha NP32: Which Is Better For Beginners?
  8. Alesis Recital Vs Yamaha P45: Which Offers Great Value For Money?
  9. Donner DEP-10 Vs Alesis Recital: Which Is The Best Semi-Weighted Digital Piano?
  10. Alesis Recital vs Concert: Which Is The Better Piano For Beginners?
  11. Alesis Recital vs Alesis Recital Pro: Should You Invest In The Recital Pro?
  12. Yamaha P71 vs Alesis Recital: Why the Amazon Exclusive P71 Is the Best Option for Beginners

References:

5/5 - (1 vote)