Alesis Recital Vs Yamaha P45: Which Offers Great Value For Money?

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After sizing up all related attributes, the modestly-priced Recital offers way more, ergo the better option, in the Alesis Recital Vs Yamaha P45 match-up.

There are over a dozen low-cost digital pianos from different brands to choose from today. And while these are specifically made for beginners, many companies have decided to beef up their offering to produce almost the same feel and sound of an acoustic upright. 

Two of the most favored pieces are the Recital by Alesis and the P45 by Yamaha, evidenced by the number of sales in the recent past. While the latter is backed by the century-old experience of Yamaha in piano manufacture, the former’s edge is its affordability. 

There is no doubt that these two are great options for newbies: full 88-keys, acoustic simulation, relatively lightweight, and not heavy on the pocket. But the pressing question here is which gets more points in the Alesis Recital Vs Yamaha scoreboard? 

Alesis Recital Vs Yamaha P45: Comparison Chart

Image
The Winner (#1)
Alesis Recital – 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Semi Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 5 Voices, Split, Layer and Lesson Mode, FX and Piano Lessons
The Runner-Up (#2)
Yamaha P45 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano
Model
Alesis Recital
Yamaha P45
Number of keys
88
88
Hammer action
Semi-weighted keys
GHS Weighted Action
Touch sensitivity
Adjustable touch response
Hard / Medium / Soft / Fixed
Tone generation
Sampling
AWM Stereo Sampling
Effects
Reverb, Chorus
Reverb
Lesson mode
Dual mode
Split mode
Number of voices
5
10
Amplifier
2 10W
2 6W
Headphone input
AUX out
Yes, Stereo RCA
No
MIDI
Yes, USB
Yes, USB
Maximum polyphony
128
64
Pedal included
What I like
Price
$229.00
$549.99
The Winner (#1)
Image
Alesis Recital – 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Semi Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 5 Voices, Split, Layer and Lesson Mode, FX and Piano Lessons
Model
Alesis Recital
Number of keys
88
Hammer action
Semi-weighted keys
Touch sensitivity
Adjustable touch response
Tone generation
Sampling
Effects
Reverb, Chorus
Lesson mode
Dual mode
Split mode
Number of voices
5
Amplifier
2 10W
Headphone input
AUX out
Yes, Stereo RCA
MIDI
Yes, USB
Maximum polyphony
128
Pedal included
What I like
Price
$229.00
More infor
The Runner-Up (#2)
Image
Yamaha P45 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano
Model
Yamaha P45
Number of keys
88
Hammer action
GHS Weighted Action
Touch sensitivity
Hard / Medium / Soft / Fixed
Tone generation
AWM Stereo Sampling
Effects
Reverb
Lesson mode
Dual mode
Split mode
Number of voices
10
Amplifier
2 6W
Headphone input
AUX out
No
MIDI
Yes, USB
Maximum polyphony
64
Pedal included
What I like
Price
$549.99
More infor

Last update on 2022-05-22 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Alesis Recital Vs Yamaha P45: Head to Head Comparison

Alesis’ Recital and Yamaha’s P45 are popular options among beginners but for very different reasons. 

For over one hundred years, Yamaha has built a reputation for creating high-quality and long-lasting musical instruments.. The P45 is packed with excellent features that Yamaha is known for. Then again, it is an entry-level piece so it does fall short on certain aspects. 

Admittedly, more people go for the Alesis, not for its name (it’s a newcomer in the industry) but for its price. The $200 or so price tag on the Recital is irresistible. However, this particular model surprised me with its features and functions. 

Alesis’ Recital wins by just a tiny bit with a 2:1 ratio. Read more to find out why I gave the trophy to the less illustrious pick. 

Feel

The Winner: Yamaha P45

Yamaha has had a whole lot of time to perfect the mechanism of their digital pianos, and it shows in the P45. If it’s realism that you want under your fingers, you’ll definitely get that with the fully weighted keys and even that slight escapement on the Yamaha. The Recital’s keys are semi-weighted, but it’s not as remarkable as its rival; that’s why this point goes to the P45.

+Hammer Action

Yamaha makes use of the proprietary Graded Hammer Standard (GHS) hammer action. The ‘graded’ part refers to the variation on the keys’ weight – heavier on the bass and lighter on the trebles. They also included the escapement feel on the P45, which adds to its realism.

The Recital only has semi-weighted keys. This flaw isn’t a bad thing, per se, and some actually prefer this. But if your goal is to practice on the digital piano to play just as well on a concert grand, the P45 is the better option in this regard.

Semi-weighted keys of Alesis Recital
Semi-weighted keys of Alesis Recital

+Touch Sensitivity

The pressure you put on the keys is directly proportional to the volume of the sound that comes out. Since there are different acoustic pianos, companies have started to add touch sensitivity to their digital offerings.

The P45 has four levels – Hard, Medium (the standard), Soft, and Fixed. The Recital has three different intensities and an ‘off’ option.  

+Key Texture

There is no perfect entry-level digital piano, and this particular facet exemplifies that well. The two companies economized here by using smooth plastic keys. Sure, the P45’s ebonies are matte, but this does not greatly impress at all.

Tone

The Winner: Yamaha P45

Aside from the Feel, the Tone is another vital component in digital pianos that potential buyers should note. I tagged the P45 of Yamaha as the winner here mainly because it uses better technology. But this is in no way a disparagement to Alesis’ Recital’s features. It may have less but considering its price, you’re still getting a good deal.  

+Tone Generator

A lot of companies make use of Sampling as their method for tone generation. This is essentially recording the sounds from an actual acoustic instrument and then storing that data into the digital piano. 

The Alesis Recital has no particular moniker to their sound engine, but I find it clear and brilliant enough for my taste. They also added natural decay to the tones, which produces a surprisingly authentic sound. 

On the other hand, Yamaha makes use of the AMW (Advanced Wave Memory) Stereo Sampling. I won’t go into ultra-technical details, but this involves more steps in the recording and recreation of the sound, resulting in richer and more detailed tones. 

+Sound Library

The P45 has ten voices which include several pianos and other instruments. The number is limited for a Yamaha but the company did ensure quality for the pianos and strings. I don’t care for the organ that much and the harpsichord is dismal. 

+Digital Effects

The Alesis Recital only has five – acoustic and electric pianos, an organ, a synth, and a bass. Despite the short supply, there is very little to complain about the quality of the Recital’s voices. 

Integral Features and Functions

The Winner: Alesis Recital

While the Recital falls short compared to the advanced systems Yamaha used for the hammer action and sound engine, Alesis satisfies users in other features and functions detailed in this chapter.

+Polyphony

This feature is defined as the number of notes that the piano can play at a single time. And this is where Yamaha’s P45 greatly disappoints, with only a maximum of 64. Some say this is enough for beginners, which is a fair point, but similar models from other brands already have over a hundred.

A good case in point is the Alesis Recital. It has a max polyphony of 128, a remarkable feature for a $200 digital piano. 

+Standard Functions and Playing Modes

Yamaha P45 has usable game modes
Yamaha P45 has usable game modes

These digital pianos have the must-have functions: metronome, transposition, and – as mentioned earlier – touch sensitivity. 

The two also share some playing modes crucial to learning. The first is the Twin or Lesson mode, which divides the 88 keys into two 44-key pianos so that the tutor and the student can play side-by-side. The second is the Layering or Dual mode, which allows the piano to play two different voices when a key is pressed.

However, the Recital has one mode that the P45 doesn’t have: the Split mode, which bisects the piano into two sets of 44 keys, allowing each side to play a different voice. 

+Speaker System

The Alesis Recital also walks off with another point here because it has more substantial amplification with two 10W power. On top of that, the speaker cones are located on top of the piece. The Yamaha P45 only has two 6W power, and worse, its speaker cones are downward facing. 

+Connectivity and Storage

It’s a bit of a toss-up in this particular factor because the P45 lacks some connectivity capabilities while the Recital lacks essential accessories. 

For instance, Yamaha failed to include an AUX out, which is needed in this model since it was not outfitted with powerful speakers. On the other hand, it’s odd that Alesis didn’t include a pedal in the set. 

Alesis Recital Vs Yamaha P45: The Similarities 

Although one would not mistake the Recital for the P45 at first glance, the two are pretty much alike in the most important physical attributes. I find the Alesis offering a bit heavier, but generally speaking, these two are lightweight and compact, therefore portable. 

As already described in a few chapters above, these models from Alesis and Yamaha share similarities under the hood as well. First of all, the entire 88-key set-up is weighted. Next, the specific method of recording the sounds for tone generation may have different names, but both essentially make use of sampling. The two also have the same basic effects, functions, and playing modes – all incredibly helpful for 

The truth is most people choose based on what they like – what feels greatl under their fingers and what sounds good to their ears. But if you’re a savvy shopper, it’s best to take the tech and the price tag into consideration. 

When all things are considered, the Amazon-exclusive Recital with all its features, functions, and $200 price tag gives more value for money than the P45, which goes over the $500-mark. If you’re dead set on getting a Yamaha, go for a higher model instead. 

Quick Rundown of the Alesis Recital

Alesis Recital – 88 Key Digital Piano Keyboard with Semi Weighted Keys, 2x20W Speakers, 5 Voices, Split, Layer and Lesson Mode, FX and Piano Lessons
  • An Electric Piano That’s Tailored to You - Feature-packed Electric keyboard with 88 premium full-sized semi weighted keys with adjustable touch response to suit your preferred playing style
  • Premium Sounds - 5 voices (Acoustic Piano, Electric Piano, Organ, Synth, and Bass), built-in FX: Chorus, Reverb, and two built in 20W speakers that deliver crystal-clear, room-filling sound
  • All The Right Connections - ¼” sustain pedal input (pedal not included), ¼” stereo headphone output for private practice and stereo RCA outputs for connection to speakers / amplifiers
  • Play the Keyboard Wherever You Go - Power via the included power adapter or 6 D cell batteries (not included) for professional piano performance anywhere
  • Powerful Educational Features - Standard, split, layer, and lesson modes with 128-note max polyphony and Skoove 3 month premium subscription for expert interactive online piano lessons

Last update on 2022-05-22 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • One of the most affordable entry-level digital pianos in the market
  • Considered to be one of the best keyboards for beginners
  • Polyphony goes as high as 128
  • Has all basic functions and playing modes
  • Outfitted with two, upward facing 10W speakers
  • Comes with a 3-month premium Skoove subscription
Cons
  • Short on built-in voices
  • Semi-weighted hammer action can be improved
  • No sustain pedal in the set

Quick Rundown of the Yamaha P45

Yamaha P45 88-Key Weighted Digital Piano
  • Includes the P45 Digital Piano, power adapter, sustain pedal and music rest
  • 88 fully weighted piano style keys simulate the feel of an acoustic piano and provide a quality playing experience
  • GHS weighted action is heavier in the low end and lighter in the high end, just like an acoustic piano
  • Contains 10 different voices, including digitally sampled tones from real Yamaha acoustic grand pianos
  • Dual mode lets you combine 2 voices together, like piano and strings, for an inspiring new playing experience. Tuning- 414.8 - 440.0 - 446.8 Hz

Last update on 2022-05-22 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros
  • Makes use of the Graded Hammer System for realistic acoustic feel
  • Simple but effective AWM Stereo Sampling sound engine
  • Usable playing modes are helpful for beginners
  • Smart Pianist app connects via USB
Cons
  • Disappointingly short on polyphony with just 64
  • White keys have a plastic feel to them
  • A bit on the expensive side for an entry-level digital piano

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Reference

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